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TaylorMade M4 Rescue Review

50 Words or Less

The TaylorMade M4 rescue is a powerful hybrid that’s easy to hit and forgiving.  A lot of technology packed into a reasonably sized, attractive head.

Introduction

I’ve been playing a couple of hybrids for about five years now and have no fear when distances creep past my 5 iron.  For a few months, I’d been thinking about checking out the latest hybrid offerings to update my bag.  Keeping my eyes open at the 2018 PGA Merchandise Show, I really got the bug as I heard from club experts about all the latest technology.  When I got my hands on this TaylorMade M4 Rescue, I couldn’t wait to hit some balls – and I wasn’t disappointed.

Looks

Although larger, the TaylorMade M4 rescue shares the same two-tone crown as the M3, which looks fantastic at address.  Like its big brother the M4 fairway, the “sole is sleek and ready for business.”

The face is a moderate height and the prominent white bottom groove frames the golf ball perfectly with proper setup.  The black/silver/red of the head is echoed in the Fujikura Atmos Red shaft.

Sound & Feel

TaylorMade utilizes Geocoustics – the blend of head geometry and acoustical engineering – in the M4 rescue.  Without the carbon crown found in the other M4 woods, the rescue had a solid ‘click’ sound.  The pleasant tone was fairly consistent across the face.

Two design features of the M4 Rescue limit the feedback:  the long Speed Pocket behind the face and the split internal weighting.  Even when I missed the center of the face, the club felt stable and productive.  I could tell when I flushed a shot, but mishits still felt decent.  I didn’t feel cheated because those decent feeling shots produced decent results.

Performance

Looking back at my notes from the first range session with the TaylorMade M4 Rescue, I had written down: “Wow.  Straight.  High”.  No ‘get to know you’ time with this club – it was immediately easy to hit.  And the forgiveness mentioned above really showed up on Trackman with notable consistency in distances.  If you’re like me, hybrids get used everywhere from tight lies to deep rough, and it’s awesome when you can trust the yardage no matter where on the face you strike the ball.

Looking at the bottom of the M4 Rescue, you can see the matte black areas on the sole.  Parallel to the face is the Speed Pocket and the two pads that point to the center of the face are the split weighting features.  The combination of those technologies produced outstanding ball speed and an average smash factor of 1.51.  That’s serious firepower.

Conclusion

In my playing circles, I might see an occasional 4 iron from the better players, but most folks have switched to hybrids.  Straight and forgiving is fine for me, so I don’t mind not having the adjustability of the M3.  The clean lines on the M4 hybrid sole reaffirm that the club will slide effortlessly through the grass as I pull it from my bag.  If you need help on longer shots the term ‘rescue’ might be appropriate.  For me, the TaylorMade M4 is a hybrid that allows me to attack the golf course with confidence.

Buy the TaylorMade M4 Rescue HERE

TaylorMade M4 Rescue Price & Specs

Matt Meeker
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10 Comments

  1. Fritz Flokstra

    Hello Matt,
    I’m wondering how much more better the shot dispersion is with these hybrids are compared to the M2 hybrids? Are they much longer? Easier to get through the grass?
    Thank you,
    Fritz

    • Matt Meeker

      Sorry Fritz, I don’t recall ever hitting an M2 hybrid so I can’t offer any comparisons.

      Thanks for reading,

      Matt M

  2. Bruce Laycraft

    I find the nomenclature getting more and more confusing. I have a set of Adams with 1, 3, & 5 “woods” and 4 to 9 “irons” and two wedges. My “woods” are not wood nor are they metal—they are a composite of many different materials. My “irons” (each with a distinct loft and length) are not iron because they too are made of many different materials, none of which is iron. My question(s): “Where does a M4 Rescue club fit into my standard set of clubs? Does it hit longer than my 4 “iron” yet shorter than my 5 “wood”? What club would I have to remove from my set to fit it in?

  3. Bruce Laycraft

    Hi Matt,
    I find all the nomenclature very confusing. What club would I remove from my standard set (of Adams) clubs in order to put in a club such as the M4 “Rescue”? Is it shorter than a regular fairway “wood’ & longer than a regular “iron” or would it replace one or the other? (I used quotation marks around the terms wood and iron because I don’t think there is any wood or iron used in todays clubs—just steel, carbon fibre, fibreglass, etc.)

    • Matt Meeker

      Great questions and comments Bruce. I coach with The First Tee and trying to explain to kids why we call things what we do in golf is a challenge. And as far as a “standard” set of clubs, it’s hard to even know what that is these days. Very loosely stated, a fairway wood travels further than a hybrid/rescue. A hybrid/rescue is more closely associated with and equivalent iron. For me, a 4 iron and a 4 hybrid travel about the same and it’s the easier hitting ability of the hybrid that has me choose it over the iron in my bag. To further complicate things, most companies offer many lofts in woods and hybrids. And one companies 4 iron can be many degrees different even between their own models. So to get back to your first question, consider a rescue/hybrid for replacing long irons. And check the gapping between clubs in real performance. Most golfers have a club or two in their bag that they seldom hit because of hittability (trust) or being a distance you just don’t require often. In those cases, think about try out some other clubs that may be better suited to your game.

      Hope that helps.

      Matt M

  4. George Gordon

    I am now 80 years old and my handicap has risen to 18. I am fairly consistent and hit my custom fitted driver about 200 yards. I have a Ping G30 Three Wood which is suitable, but wonder whether I should substitute my 5 and 7 Fairway woods for Hybrids, having experienced great results with an M4 Hybrid recently – it seemed to go miles for me – comfortably and easily around 170 yards.

    • Matt Saternus

      George,

      That sounds like something worth exploring with a qualified fitter. For me hybrids are much easier to hit.

      Best,

      Matt

  5. Brad Shepard

    How is this hybrid holding greens?

    • Matt Meeker

      As tested, the club was ok at holding greens. A shaft that produced a higher trajectory would be needed to move that to ‘great’ – for me. Definitely worth hitting and seeing how it performs for you Brad.

      – Meeks

  6. Pingback: TaylorMade M6 Hybrid Review - Plugged In Golf

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