Titleist TSR4 Driver Review

titleist tsr4 driver

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The Titleist TSR4 driver is a sub-460cc beauty.  Face technology designed to enhance forgiveness.  Very low spin.  Adjustable weights to dial in spin and feel.

Introduction

Titleist bills their new TSR4 as “the ultimate low-spin driver,” but more than that, it’s the biggest flex on the tee box.  In this era, pulling out a driver that’s sub-460cc lets everyone know that you intend to put on a driving clinic.  But is it possible that Titleist snuck enough technology into the TSR4 to make it playable for weekend golfers?  I tested one to find out.

titleist tsr4 driver address

Looks

Having reviewed the original TS4 driver [HERE], I had high expectations for the looks of the TSR4.  It does not disappoint.  The small “TSR” alignment aid creates a focal point on the gloss black crown.  This driver has a slight pear shape and is very compact in every dimension.

Flipping it over, you’ll find a sole that matches the crown’s black and silver color scheme.  The sole of the TSR4 driver is actually a touch busier than the 2 or 3 thanks to the two weight ports, but it’s still one of the slickest looking drivers in the bag.

Setting the TSR4 driver (above, left) next to the TSR 3 [review HERE], the size difference is noticeable.  The face is about 1/4″ shorter from heel-to-toe.  The TSR4 is also shorter from front-to-back and more aggressively slimmed in the heel.  That said, when they aren’t next to each other, the TSR3 and TSR4 are not easy to tell apart.

titleist tsr4 driver face

Sound & Feel

Titleist kept the marvelous sound and feel of the TSR drivers consistent across the line.  Just like its brothers, the TSR4 driver is very quiet at impact.  I’ve enjoyed the understated sound in all three drivers, but it’s most at home with the smallest of the group.

The quiet sound is complemented by a feel that’s very light and quick off the face.  This club doesn’t feel remotely hollow, but the ball seems to tap the club face rather than crashing into it.  Despite the light impact sensation, there’s plenty of feedback on strike location.

Performance

My first thought when I heard of the TSR4 driver was that it would be designed entirely for Tour players.  However, what I learned in my conversation with the people who designed the club [listen HERE] was that they aimed to make it more widely playable.  To that end, they used the same face technology in the TSR4 as they did in the TSR2.  While the TSR3 driver has a face meant to optimize center strikes, the multi-plateau VFT in the 2 and 4 gives more ball speed to imperfect shots.

This face technology works very well, but I do want to be clear that this driver is not meant for high handicap players.  The TSR2 driver [review HERE] is a driver for all players.  The TSR4 driver is for those that primarily hit the center of the face.  When I was swinging well, the TSR4 produced mid-launch, low spin bombs.  However, when my swing went south, I missed the stability of the TSR2.

Titleist bills the TSR4 driver as the ultimate low spin driver, but the adjustability makes it more than that.  There are two, interchangeable “flat weights” in the head – one at the rear, one in the middle of the sole.  One of these weights is 3 grams, the other is 11 grams.  With the heavier weight forward, you get maximum spin reduction.  When you place the heavier weight back, you get what Titleist calls the “TSR3.5” with a touch more spin and a little more stability.

True to form, Titleist made the differences in these two positions noticeable but not extreme.  I could feel the weight shift, and I had a clear preference, but neither position felt unplayable.  As someone who is naturally low spin but needs forgiveness, putting the heavier weight back was an easy choice for me.  Even in this “higher spin” position, the TSR4 driver produced low, piercing drives.  Combining the weights with the SureFit Hosel gives fitters and golfers a world of options to explore during a fitting.

titleist tsr4 driver

Conclusion

If your problem is high spin, the Titleist TSR4 driver is your answer.  It’s the same if you want to play arguably the most beautiful driver available.  The TSR4 is an impressive club that gives players a lot of adjustability and more forgiveness than you should expect from a 430cc head.

Visit Titleist HERE

Titleist TSR4 Driver Price & Specs

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Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

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11 Comments

  1. What shaft did you test this with? Thanks and keep up the great work.

  2. Beautiful driver! I’ve played Titleist since they came out with the 975D. Playing a TS3 now but would love to have a TSR4, I would have to sell a kidney to afford it though!

  3. Hi Matt. Been waiting for your review of this driver. Looking to get fitted for one myself. I currently play the Mavrik Sub Zero as I’ve not found anything since that has been low spin enough for me. In you opinion is the TSR4 as low spin as the Mav SZ? The last couple of years the lowest spinning options have not been as low as previous years. I’m just curious as to where you would say the TSR4 model sits. I appreciate the shaft also plays it’s part. I’m currently playing the Hzrdus Smoke Yellow (small batch) 65TX. Thanks in advance

    • Matt Saternus

      Tony,

      I think I agree with you – the OEMs seem to have moderated how low they want to go with spin.
      Based on my recollection, I do think the TSR4 is comparable in terms of spin to the Mavrik SZ, but YMMV and my memory can be shaky at times.

      Best,

      Matt

      • Thank you for your reply Matt. My swing speed is very similar to yours which is why I’m always very interested in your reviews. I play with high spin which is why I’m always looking at ways to reduce it. I really like the look of the TSR4 and the 1K black could be a good shaft for me too. Thanks again, and keep up the excellent reviews.

  4. Went back and read your review and launch monitor numbers on the Ping G410 LST (my current gamer). The G410 LST beats this new Titleist head-to-head on distance and accuracy. Not sure why anyone looking for low spin wouldn’t go that route and save a ton buying a used driver. I hate the turbulator look on my LST compared to TSR’s clean lines, but my weekly golf buddy got a brand new TSR3 and hates that I still blow drives last him more. I can live with that and the extra $$$ in my pocket.

  5. Hi Matt,

    Thank you for the substantial review. I play the TSi4 currently, I am looking for less spin, but would welcome more forgiveness. How does TSR4 performs compared to TSi4? Other question, somebody suggested for low spin the Fujikura Ventus Velocore shafts (they are very expensive), what do you think about it?

    Best regards,

    Tom (Hcp 6)

    • Matt Saternus

      I did not review the TSi4, so unfortunately I can’t offer an educated comparison.
      The Ventus Black shafts are quite low spin, but, as always, I need to stress the importance of being fit into the right shaft.

      Best,

      Matt

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