SuperSpeed C Review

50 Words or Less

The SuperSpeed C club compliments SuperSpeed’s Overspeed training clubs by increasing hand and arm speed.  Counterweighted to promote faster release speed.

Introduction

Over the last several years, SuperSpeed clubs have become a common sight in the bags of professional golfers around the world.  There’s little question about why: the system works [read my review HERE].

New for 2020 is the SuperSpeed C training club, a counterweighted club designed to boost hand and arm speed.  I was excited to test it to see if it could push my swing speed to even higher levels.

Ease of Use & Set Up

The SuperSpeed C training club, just like the Overspeed System, is simply a golf club with a weight instead of a club head.  There’s no set up required.

When you get the SuperSpeed C, you’ll want to check the SuperSpeed website HERE for the Training Protocols.  Each level and each exercise is explained both in text and video.

Effectiveness

Counterweight training alters the physics of your golf swing by changing the balance point of the golf club and moves mass behind your hands. This allows for faster release speed which produces faster hand and arm speed in your golf swing.

To judge the effectiveness of the SuperSpeed C, I put myself through the suggested six weeks of the Level 1 Protocols.  Before I started training, I established a baseline maximum swing speed of 108 MPH.  I had been reasonably injury free leading up to that, and had been playing and doing Overspeed training with some frequency.  I feel like this baseline is, if anything, fairly high, and gave the SuperSpeed C a stout test.

After training three time per week for six weeks, I tested myself again.  My new maximum swing speed was 110 MPH.  Considering that my baseline was fairly high and I’ve already been using SuperSpeed training, I’m quite pleased with the result.  I think that players who haven’t been using over speed training for as long as I have can expect to see larger gains.

Longevity

Just like the original SuperSpeed system, the C Club is essentially a workout program, and a repetitive one at that.  There’s not a big time or space commitment to using the SuperSpeed C, but you will need to warm up, go all out on your swings, and take the time to recover between sets.

Ultimately, I view this as a tool for the serious player who is committed to improving their game.

Value

The SuperSpeed C sells through the company’s website HERE for $99.  Again, if you’re a serious player who wants to get everything they can out of their game, this is a worthwhile investment.  Smart golfers know that distance is a huge advantage, so finding every way to maximize your speed is essential to reaching your potential.

Conclusion

The SuperSpeed C is a good addition to the SuperSpeed training system.  Whether you’ve been using SuperSpeed for a long time and are looking for something to freshen things up or you’re new to over speed training, this is a tool that can add speed and distance to your game.

Buy the SuperSpeed C HERE

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Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

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10 Comments

  1. I started using my own “weighted” club for some time a couple of years ago without ever having heard of your “speed swing”. I don’t have a meter to test my swing speed – but driving the greens off the senior tees on par 4’s is what is happening for me. BTW – I will be 77 next month & in my 8th year playing golf. LOL

  2. Michael Haley

    I’ve been using it along with the normal set for 3-4 months now. 2-3 times a week along with working with a certified TPI trainer. My max speed has gone from 101 to 114. Great system and it helps.

  3. I was thinking about buying the Superspeed set. Is this something to add to the set or is it a standalone alternative?

    • Matt Saternus

      Keith,

      The C is a stand alone, a compliment to the original set. In my opinion, I would start with the set than add the C if I hit a plateau later on.

      Best,

      Matt

  4. Have you noticed a better release of the club? Are you turning it over more?

    • Matt Saternus

      Andrew,

      At the risk of being pedantic, I don’t know what a “better” release is. I’m still hitting the ball straight, but I have more speed.

      Best,

      Matt

  5. Thanks for the great review Matt. I’ve also been using Superspeed for some time and my playing max is 100mph. For more speed, I am thinking of going from a 68 gram driver shaft to a 55 gram. In your fitting experience, is there a general rule of thumb on how much swing speed (if any) you gain by dropping some shaft weight? Thanks for the insight.

    • Matt Saternus

      Odie,

      I don’t think there’s a straight line relationship between shaft weight and swing speed. It’s certainly worth exploring for every golfer, but I don’t think you can expect a noticeable difference from dropping 7 grams.

      Best,

      Matt

  6. I am a firm believer of the Superspeed C system as well as the original 3-stick protocol. The system is not a magic pill and requires hard work and commitment. To provide my experience with the system, I started in August 2019 and had a baseline driver SS of 95mph. As of now, my baseline driver SS is 112-113mph (max 117mph / 169 ball speed). I have topped out at 145mph with the Superspeed C club. Admittedly, I have only worked on my right hand dominant side and still have seen a jump. During the off season, I will work on my weaker (left hand) side swings with the aim of jump to 117mph by Spring of 2021. Get after it and it will pay off!

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