Srixon ZX Mk II Hybrid Review

srixon zx mk ii hybrid sole

50 Words or Less

The Srixon ZX Mk II hybrid offers better players consistency in both spin and ball speed.  Nice forgiveness, great looks.

Introduction

As Matt Saternus highlighted in his intro of the ZX Mk II fairway wood [full review HERE], Srixon is offering just one model of hybrid for 2023.  A handful of years ago that wouldn’t be surprising, as hybrids were played almost exclusively by aging golfers whose swing speeds had diminished.  However, these days it’s common to see hybrids in the bags of tour players – young and old.  So who is the new Srixon ZX Mk II hybrid intended for?  I gave one a thorough testing to find out.

srixon zx mk ii hybrid address

Looks

While I liked the look of the prior model ZX [full review HERE], the ZX Mk II is even more appealing.  The crown, devoid of the step down, has a sleek, unfettered look – especially with the matte finish.  The head is slightly pear shaped and fairly compact in size.  Although the simple alignment aid stands out in the photo above, it’s subtle in most light conditions.

The segmentation of the sole of the ZX Mk II hybrid reminds me of armor plating – built for purpose.  The mix of gloss and matte finishes adds visual interest.  Branding is modest.  And kudos to Srixon for embroidering the club number front and center on the headcover.  For those of us with more than one hybrid in the bag, being able to identify quickly and accurately is a wonderful attribute.

srixon zx mk ii hybrid face

Sound & Feel

The Srixon ZX Mk II hybrid produced a staccato, medium volume ‘crack’ with every reasonable strike.  In harmony with the sound, contact felt brief and powerful.  Overall, feedback was subtle and gave me the sense that the club was performing even when my contact wasn’t ideal.

Performance

Not surprisingly, the feedback I received was mirrored in my results.  The consistency of the ball flight, carry, and roll were noteworthy with the ZX Mk II hybrid.  With my moderate swing speed, the 19° loft and low spin combined for a penetrating trajectory that seemed to go a mile.  That mile was more in the 190 -200 yard range, which serves a powerful spot in my bag – maximum distance with precision.

That said, the stock shaft in the ZX Mk II hybrid is designated as for “aggressive swing tempos,” which isn’t how I’d describe my swing.  For holding a green with a higher lofted hybrid I’d need to get fit for a more appropriate shaft.  On their website, Srixon lists an array of alternate shafts under “custom build” – most for no additional charge.

Regardless of the loft, Srixon revamped the center of gravity for this new ZX Mk II hybrid to produce higher launch.  Srixon achieved this by placing internal weight lower and further back in the head.  Along with “higher” I’d add “easier” to the description.

The primary engine for ball speed in the ZX Mk II hybrid is the Rebound Frame.  The Rebound Frame consists of two flex zones – the first being the face and the second a ring of titanium a bit further back in the head.  Srixon describes the Rebound Frame as a “spring within a spring” that “elevates COR across the face for increased ball speed.”  For me, strong ball speed equated to more distance.

Aiding in consistency is the new face design Srixon incorporated into the ZX Mk II hybrid.  In this new feature, the face has radius from the edge of the crown down to the sole, which maintains spin no matter where you strike the face – low, centered, or high.

srixon zx mk ii hybrid toe

Conclusion

Circling back to “who is the new Srixon ZX Mk II hybrid intended for?” – a wide array of better players.  That starts with the appealing head size and shape.  Next is the strong ball speeds across a generous area of the face.  Finally, plenty of shaft options to achieve optimized performance for the variety of swings represented in the spectrum of better players.

Visit Srixon HERE

Srixon ZX Price & Specs

Matt Meeker
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2 Comments

  1. Hello Meeks, what flex shaft did you have in this review, and how far do you hit your 7 iron, as I am just trying to gauge what shaft strength I should have. Cheers and thanks T-bone

    • Matt Meeker

      Happy to answer your questions T-bone: regular flex, 150 yards. But I implore you to hit the club yourself.

      – Meeks

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