COBRA F-Max Superlite Fairway Wood Review

50 Words or Less

Reduced in weight for increased club speed, the COBRA Golf F-Max Superlite Fairway also provides consistently good performance.  Draw-biased.

Introduction

Doing a little background research on the COBRA F-MAX Superlite web page, one tag line caught my attention:  “Lite runs in the family”.  As they did with the F-MAX Superlite Driver I recently reviewed, the engineers of the fairway reduced weight in the head, shaft and even the grip.  Those 16 grams of savings resulted in the lightest fairway COBRA has ever produced – all in an effort to increase club speed for golfers with moderate swing speeds.

You may have noted my use of ‘fairway’ alone in place of ‘fairway wood’.  While this follows COBRA’s nomenclature, I’m personally on the fence about it.  Having explained to fresh students of the game at The First Tee that clubs were actually once made of wood, I’m all for eliminating some confusion.  But that still leaves us with the whole ‘woods’ category name.  Chime in with thoughts in the comment section below.

Looks

The gold color scheme of the original F-Max has been replaced with a very pleasing red and silver for the Superlite.  The sole of the fairway is sleek with two zones of distinctive straight lines along with a subtle channel graphic running through the center.  The gloss black crown utilizes those straight lines as alignment aids, but keeps the tone muted, while “cobra” denotes the center of the clubface.  If this section sounds familiar, you must have read my driver review because other than its smaller size, the fairway is a spitting image of the driver top and bottom.

As noted on the back of the hosel, the F-MAX Superlite Fairway has some offset, but it’s minimal – nothing like the old King Cobras.   At address the club sets up slightly closed.   The face is shallow and wide, poised for solid contact off tight lies.

Sound & Feel

The forged stainless steel face of the COBRA Golf F-Max Superlite Fairway had a pleasing, medium volume metallic ‘tweenk’.  Unlike the driver, the sound was consistent across the face but there was a reasonable amount of feedback in the hands to signal strike quality.

The lightweight nature of the club made it somewhat difficult to feel where the head was at the top of the swing.

Performance

Cobra’s claim that “when it comes to maximizing speed, every gram counts” was accurate for me as I gained 2 mph in club speed over my gamer.  To test the claim further, I recruited a couple of additional golfers to hit the F-Max Superlite Fairway at Club Champion, and they achieved similar results.

Even more meaningful were the good performance numbers across the chart.  Low CG helped with a solid launch angle while the spin provided generous trajectory.  The combination of offset and slight heel oriented weighting produced a consistent left bias.  Plentiful forgiveness and consistency – a testament to a well designed club and quality materials.

Conclusion

Although categorized as a max-game improvement club, the COBRA Golf F-Max Superlite Fairway is worthy of any golfer trying to straighten out a fade – especially those who may have lost some club head speed due to age or physical limitations.  With great looks and performance, it might be easy to miss the enticing $199 price.

Buy the F-Max Superlite Driver HERE

F-Max Superlite Fairway Wood Price and Specs

The following two tabs change content below.

Matt Meeker

Matt lives in sunny Orlando with his wife who allows his golf obsession to stretch the limits of normalcy. He's also a proud coach with The First Tee of Central Florida who loves teaching kids about golf and life skills.

Latest posts by Matt Meeker (see all)

4 Comments

  1. Matt, I thought the term “fairway metal” was a good one. Apparently, it didn’t catch-on. Does Cobra make a Superlite without a closed face or offset for golfers who don’t need to correct a slice? Thanks, Lee

    • ‘Fairway metal’ works well IMO Lee. As per your question, the Superlite Fairway only comes in the one style unlike the driver.

      – Meeks

  2. This use of “metal” rather than “wood” started with an idiot British sportscaster, and some others followed. What would you say if I said I don’t use “irons” anymore, I use “steels” Why do you want to change history ? it only refers to the shape, not the material. I used Yonex once,what would you call that, a fairway graphite ? Do the reviews and leave the rest to the idiots who think they are important.

    • Thanks for the pivotal historical event Julian. You make some valid points – but I do enjoy pretending I’m important.

      – Meeks

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*