Uneekor EYE MINI Launch Monitor Review

50 Words or Less

The Uneekor EYE MINI launch monitor is a standalone launch monitor that’s also capable of powering golf simulation. Very strong accuracy.  Balky initial set up.  Solid app.

Introduction

In our Best of 2023 podcast [listen HERE], Matt Meeker and I discussed how the product category that saw the most progress and innovation was personal launch monitors.  Just a few years ago, you had to spend well over $20,000 to get reliable data.  Now there are LMs with professional-grade accuracy for a fraction of that.  One such offering is the new Uneekor EYE MINI launch monitor.

Set Up

I cannot remember any product – launch monitor or otherwise – that came packaged as securely as the Uneekor EYE MINI.  This LM is shipped in a heavy duty, custom fit carrying case, inside a box, inside another box.  The carrying case is the single best launch monitor accessory I’ve ever seen because it houses all the EYE MINI accessories and will keep the device safe from everything short of nuclear war.

When you unpack the Uneeker EYE MINI, you’ll find the launch monitor, charger, ethernet cable, and the stickers for club measurement.  What’s disappointing is that you will not find an instruction manual or even a quick start guide.  All the manuals are found on Uneekor’s website.

After downloading the user manual, I found something unexpected: to get the EYE MINI up and running, I needed to connect it to a PC.  This is not something I’ve ever encountered with any other launch monitor.  I’m an Apple user, so I had to borrow a PC to download the Uneekor Launcher and register the device.  This only took about five minutes, but it did start things off on the wrong foot.

Ease of Use

Once the Uneekor EYE MINI launch monitor is set up, it’s easy to use with an onboard display and clearly labeled buttons.  Just like the Foresight GCQuad or Bushnell Launch Pro [review HERE], you simply place the monitor near the ball and swing away.  The hitting zone is 12″ X 8″, and the EYE MINI must be 15.75″ from the ball.  After each shot, the data is displayed on the screen.  Because it’s camera-based, the EYE MINI does not require any amount of ball flight.  A single sticker needs to be placed on the club face to get club data.

Aligning the EYE MINI is done with two golf balls, no special equipment required.  This is a very clever and effective method; big hat tip to Uneekor for that.  The battery life is 5-6 hours.  Finally, the EYE MINI has a clear, crisp E-Ink display that shows all the shot data on one screen.

Accuracy & Features

The Uneeker EYE MINI launch monitor measures 11 ball and club data points.  Ball data includes ball speed, back spin, side spin, side angle, side distance, launch angle, and carry distance.  The club data – which does require the use of a single sticker on the club face – includes club speed, attack angle, smash factor, and club path.  You can get five more data points – descent angle, apex, distance to apex, flight time, and run (roll) – in the app.

As always, I tested the EYE MINI by running it head-to-head with my Foresight GCQuad [review HERE].  The hitting areas of the two devices are large enough that I was able to measure the same shots with both devices.

From the wedges through the mid irons, the two devices were in near-perfect agreement.  Ball speeds, launch angles, club measurements, and distances were all plus or minus one, and the spin numbers were within 300 RPM.  As I got into the long irons and woods, the gaps became slightly larger.  Ball speed discrepancies were as large as 2 MPH and carry distances could be as much as 4 yards apart.  Launch and spin numbers were still quite close, which makes me think part of the distance gap can be attributed to a different distance calculation.

One final accuracy note is that the EYE MINI did not handle bad shots as well as the GCQuad.  This may relate to the smaller hitting area.  When I hit a truly poor shot, the GCQuad said as much.  The EYE MINI was more likely to report a decent result.

Uneekor VIEW and Refine Software

Uneekor offers two pieces of proprietary software for the EYE MINI: VIEW and Refine.  VIEW is available on iPad and PC for free.  Refine and Refine+ are PC only and come at a cost of $1,000 and $2,000, respectively.

VIEW has the basic driving range functionality, and it works extremely well.  There are several ways to visualize your shots and your data.  There aren’t too many bells and whistles, which is actually a strength as I find that they can distract from the focus of your practice session.

VIEW connects to your iPad via the EYE MINI’s wireless network.  The connection is strong and stable.  There is another first-time user hurdle as the network has a password that you need to go back to the online user manual to find.  Overall, I think VIEW is among the better launch monitor apps I’ve tested.

Refine and Refine+ are for the golfers who want to get more entertainment out of their Uneekor EYE MINI.  Refine has five 18-hole golf courses and five training modes.  Those modes include a driving range, a short game complex, Quick Mode, Challenge Mode (arcade-like target game), and Course Practice.  Refine+ adds another fifteen full courses.  The graphics are beautiful, but thats comes with pretty strong PC requirements – 16GB of RAM, 200GB of hard drive space, and a powerful graphics chip.

Finally, the Uneekor EYE MINI can be used to power 3rd party software such as e6 Connect if you have the PRO Package (details below).

Value

The Uneekor EYE MINI launch monitor retails for $4,500 [please consider supporting Plugged In Golf by buying it HERE].

SALE: From now until the end of December, you can save $1,010 by purchasing the Uneekor EYE MINI at Rain or Shine HERE.

As with many launch monitors, there are annual fees to consider.  The PLAYER Package, which is included with purchase, gives you access to one player profile and the VIEW app on PC or iPad.  For $199 per year, you can access the PRO Package which gives you five user profiles, more saved sessions, and allows the EYE MINI to power 3rd party software.  The CHAMPION and LEGEND Packages are identical – they enable 50 user profiles and the REFINE+ Software.  The former carries an annual fee of $399; the latter requires a one-time payment of $1,999.

Overall, I think the EYE MINI is a very strong value.  It has accuracy comparable to more expensive units, and the additional fees are not required to get the basic functionality.

Uneekor EYE MINI vs. Foresight GCQuad

With the prices of launch monitors falling, it’s fair to ask, “Why would anyone buy a ‘pro grade’ launch monitor?”  The full featured GCQuad costs about $20,000; the Uneekor EYE MINI launch monitor costs $4,500 (there are some caveats to that, detailed above).

For that 4X price difference, the CGQuad provides more data points and works faster.  Particularly when searching for the ball, the EYE MINI screen has some lag and can almost look glitchy, though it never had an issue in my testing.  The GCQuad also has a larger hitting area.  Both units can measure putting as well as full swing shots, but the GCQuad has more putting data.  Finally, the GCQuad is the industry standard for accuracy (along with Trackman), and there are some discrepancies as discussed earlier.

Whether any of that is worth an additional $15,000 is up to the individual golfer and their bank account.

Uneekor EYE MINI Launch Monitor

Conclusion

The Uneekor EYE MINI launch monitor is an impressive device that brings extremely accurate data within reach of more golfers.  If you’re looking for a standalone unit that can also power high quality simulation, this is definitely on the short list to consider.

Buy the Uneekor EYE MINI HERE

Visit Uneekor HERE

Matt Saternus

8 Comments

  1. Nice review. I am interested in your thoughts of this unit vs the FlightScope Mevo+ w/Pro Package. It seems that the Mevo unit is more user friendly (especially with Apple products), somewhat less initial cost and no subscription. How do the two units compare other than that?
    Thanks

    • Matt Saternus

      Don,

      Matt Meeker reviewed the Mevo+ here: https://pluggedingolf.com/flightscope-mevo-launch-monitor-review/
      I have a very strong preference for units with onboard displays, so that’s a major plus for the EYE MINI. While I haven’t run the units head to head, my recollection of the Mevo+ tells me that the EYE MINI is more accurate and doesn’t miss shots. I think both are good values, but I would opt for the EYE MINI because I don’t use the simulation. If simulation is a major factor, that increases the cost of the EYE MINI and might tilt you toward Mevo+.

      Best,

      Matt

  2. Interesting review, Matt. I believe you’ve also reviewed Skytrak (if not the latest version). How does this camera-based LM compare to Skytrak?

    Thanks,

    • Matt Saternus

      George,

      You can find reviews of both Sky Trak models on the site.
      The biggest difference is the onboard display. For me, that’s a must because I’m more interested in numbers and practice than simulation. If you use simulation a lot, Sky Trak might make more sense.

      Best,

      Matt

  3. Great review Matt. You were pretty high on the Full Swing Kit. Do you think that’s a better option than this to compete with the higher priced units?

    • Matt Saternus

      With an acknowledgement to the fact that it’s been a year and a half since I tested the KIT, so improvements may have been made:

      I think that’s as close to a coin flip as you can get. I generally prefer camera based systems to radar because I do most of my testing indoors. That said, I prefer the user interface of the KIT, and the onboard display of the KIT is very sharp and beautiful. I think if you’re primarily an indoor user, I might lean EYE MINI. If you use it outdoors, I’d lean KIT.

      Best,

      Matt

  4. Hello, can you say wether your club path was accurate between the eye mini and quad?

    • Matt Saternus

      Dave,

      Yes, the club path readings on the EYE MINI were consistent and generally in alignment with the Quad.
      One thing that I found a bit funny: the EYE MINI actually produced good club numbers even with the Quad’s stickers and sticker placement which are different than its own.

      Best,

      Matt

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