L.A.B. Golf MEZZ.1 MAX Putter Review

50 Words or Less

The L.A.B. Golf MEZZ.1 MAX putter makes hitting your start line automatic.  Likely requires a change in technique, but the results may be worth it.  Lots of personalization and performance options.

Introduction

When it comes to golf equipment, I don’t have many regrets.  But every now and then, when I’m putting poorly, I think to myself, “Why didn’t I put the L.A.B. Golf BLAD into the bag?” [review HERE].

This review has given me a second chance with L.A.B. Golf.  I was offered the opportunity to check out their new MEZZ.1 MAX, a “supersized version” of their popular MEZZ.1 [review HERE].  Can the combination of lie angle balancing plus big time stability win a spot in my rotation?  Let’s find out.

Looks

The L.A.B. Golf MEZZ.1 MAX is at once familiar and unusual.  On one hand, it has the overall look of the fang-style putter that almost every OEM makes.  However, the placement of the shaft and the interpretation of the design make it stand out.  The shape is angular and blocky, like a fortress in a sci-fi movie.  While the shaft is installed away from the leading edge, the placement doesn’t scream out the way it does on the L.A.B. Directed Force 2.1 [review HERE].

At address, the MEZZ.1 MAX is very wide.  It’s 20% larger than the MEZZ.1, and that difference is primarily in the length from heel to toe.  However, the ribbon of silver in the middle of the head effectively eliminates everything else.  As non-traditional as this putter is, there’s nothing wild or attention-grabbing about it, so, to my eye, it sits comfortably behind the ball.

The MEZZ.1 MAX gives golfers a number of customization options.  L.A.B. Golf offers the standard MEZZ.1 MAX in black for $470.  For $560, you get to choose from six colors and eleven alignment markings.  This also unlocks shaft options from Accra, LA Golf, and Breakthrough Golf (all at an upcharge) and five grip options (no upcharge).

Sound & Feel

My first note on the sound of the L.A.B. Golf MEZZ.1 MAX putter is that it’s extremely quiet.  Even with a very firm Tour ball, hitting a long putt, all it musters is a quiet “tick.”

The quiet sound enhances the very soft feel of impact.  I wouldn’t necessarily have guessed that such a futuristic putter would be this soft, but it is.

With such gentle input through the hands and ears, you need to be alert to get much feedback.  Mishits do produce a slightly different pitch than pure strikes, but they’re generally too quiet to be noticed.  If you want to know how well you struck the ball, you need to pay attention to your hands.

One thing I discovered thanks to a visit to Club Champion is that the shaft plays a huge role in the impact sound.  Having tested numerous putter shafts, I knew that it would change the feel, but I was shocked at the auditory difference.  The stock steel shaft created a much louder sound, more of a “tink.”  Per the L.A.B. Golf website, the Accra shaft creates the “softest feel” of any of their premium shafts.

Performance

If you’re unfamiliar with L.A.B. Golf, you can get the full story on their tech HERE.  The one sentence version is that their putters have no torque, so they square themselves to your arc, making putting easier.

As I discussed in my previous L.A.B. putter reviews, I found that using a torque-free putter required a change in technique.  I have to take my thumbs off the putter grip so that I don’t steer the club the way I need to with a normal putter.

Knowing this technique in advance allowed me to have instant success with the MEZZ.1 MAX.  Getting the ball rolling on line was automatic.  I felt like I was playing one of those early golf video games where hitting your line was a given.  I still had to get the read and speed correct, but if I did that, making the putt was assured.

Finally, the MEZZ.1 MAX does feel stable on mishits.  When I intentionally hit long putts off the extreme toe or heel, there was minimal twisting and the ball still got near the hole.  The more important thing, however, is that I rarely mishit putts with this club.  In addition to making it easier to hit my start line, the zero torque design seemed to put the ball on the center of the face more consistently.  I’m aware that sounds like hype, but my sense is that, because I wasn’t trying to control the face, I was allowing the putter to naturally return to address and pure each putt.

Performance Options

There are several options to consider when ordering a L.A.B. Golf MEZZ.1 MAX putter.  First is the length.  L.A.B. Golf offers the MEZZ.1 MAX in standard lengths, armlock, and broomstick.  You’ll notice that the longer builds have twice as many weights in the sole – 16 – as the standard length builds.

If you opt for a standard length putter, you can choose to have it weighted Standard, Heavy, or Light.  L.A.B. Golf recommends Standard for most golfers, but you can send it back to be re-weighted after you’ve purchased it.  Re-weighting costs $100.

Finally, there are L.A.B. Golf’s proprietary grips.  What makes them unique is the built-in forward press.  Their grips have either 1.5 or 3 degrees of forward press.  There are also different grip weights and shapes.  You can read up on the different models and fitting recommendations HERE.  I used the Press II 1.5 with the MEZZ.1 MAX, and it felt like a natural fit with the putter.

Conclusion

If you’re ready to take a big leap in the name of better putting, I strongly recommend the L.A.B. Golf MEZZ.1 MAX putter.  It will require some change in your technique and riding out a learning curve, but the results can be absolutely amazing.

Visit L.A.B. Golf HERE

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Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

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15 Comments

  1. Good Review. One thing I don’t believe you mentioned is the absolute (IMHO) necessity to be fitted for a lie angle balanced putter. If you try one of these at a big box store, and you don’t fit into a stock lie or length, you’re going to wonder, “Why all the hype?” Get one that fits you though, and putting becomes almost magic.

    There’s a simple online process involving sending them a video of you putting, if you can’t make it to their factory in person, and it works well.

    How long did it take you to get distances down with the Mezz Max, Matt? I’m still learning, a month after my DF showed up.

    • Matt Saternus

      George,

      Great point. At the risk of hyperbole, these putters are useless if they’re not fit to your body/set up/stroke. As you say, it is easy to do, even online, so there’s no reason not to be fit.
      With regard to distance, it depends what your standard is for having distances “down.” It felt pretty natural right away, though it should be noted again that I had previous experience with LAB. Was every long putt stone dead? No, but I was at my normal standard within the first session.

      Best,

      Matt

  2. Patrick Burke

    I have the Mezz Max. Just got it but love it. I’m curious what you mean when say you use a new technique and say you take your thumbs off the grip? Is that just what it sounds like? Can you provide more details? Love the articles. Thanks.

    • Matt Saternus

      Patrick,

      It is exactly what it sounds like – take your normal hand positon, then raise your thumbs off the grip. It largely removes your ability to “steer” the putter.

      Best,

      Matt

  3. Having been a blade putter user for over 50 years and reading about LAB since their inception when they came out with Blad 2 I pulled the trigger to try. Having been using a Cleveland Huntington Beach #8 which was quite forgiving for the last couple of years, I was somewhat disappointed. The sweet spot is quite small and if you don’t hit it perfect I would be far short of the cup. Tried for 6 months and then moved on. Mezz Max looks more forgivable. DF 2.1 felt very forgiving when I tried at PGA superstore with a stock model but the shape and size is just too much for me. I did buy a Cobra 3D supernova which is the best non blade putter that suits my putting stroke better than anything else, even my golf buddies tell me “you found a winner.”

  4. No way Jose that’s way too much money

  5. larry russell

    what about the lie angle?how flat am5’3”

    • Matt Saternus

      Larry,

      Getting the right lie angle for your height and set up is part of the fitting process. Visit their website for video fitting information.

      -Matt

    • Larry, a couple of points on that, First, their video fitting is easy—Sam, the founder, has a short youtube clip that walks you through the process. And LAB’s customer service is quite good. The results I received, for my ideal putter, were in alignment with those I found before using PING’s iPhone app.

      Second, once you have those stats…you can go to LAB’s outlet, and find used putters for about 1/2 off. The feeling of using one of these putters is really different, and I can see a lot of golfers not getting used to it. So there’s a bit of inventory at the Outlet…

      Finally, on the feel thing. It’s going to feel very muted on strikes, as Matt noted. The putter is going to feel like it wiggles during the stroke. Let it. (That’s where the thumbs off comes from.) Oh, and see if you can try their various “press grips” at a bigbox, like PGASS, ahead of time. I’ve discovered I’m not a fan of the 3 degree Press II this thing came with, and would likely have preferred a narrower grip. Oh well. Don’t be me.

      The different feel makes it hard for me to dial in, say, 25 feet from the stroke I know gives me 18 feet. Once I know what 25 feet feels like, I can hit it again and again. Putting practice sometimes feels like shuffleboard. But the stroke length change feel for more or less distance is quite a bit different than the Anser I used before. The line it starts on is usually very true with a pure roll, much more consistently for me than the Anser.

      I’m very happy with my L.A.B. putter. All I’m saying is, give it a chance for awhile, should you try a fitted one.

  6. Wayne Nicholls

    A very Solid Review with One Notable Exception – I totally disagree with needing to remove your thumbs?? It makes it sound like you need some odd approach to see results here?? – To the contrary – I have a Mezz Maxx 34.5″ 71* standard Press 1.5 Also have the DF 2.1 with the Press 3.0 – No Adjustment needed on grip style…….Basically it’s automatic (Auto-Magic) with a traditional grip with just a bit of a relaxed pressure – Swing thought is “just let it go” or “long right hand” it just goes down the intended line every time – Frankly I can putt cross handed or claw with no change to the approach other than the aforementioned light pressure – No need to steer it no need to take your thumbs off.

  7. Hi they’re all really considering a Mezz max. One question I have in the back of my mind is how deep is the face at the point of strike. My weakness is keeping the face low and the ball equator hits the top edge, all my putters make a horrible outcome in both sound, feel and roll. Canyone tell me how deep the face is please so I can either move forward on a purchase or not. Many thanks great review btw.

  8. Hi, I’ve seen comments that the Mezz Max feels light did you notice this? Thank you.

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