How to Cut a Golf Shaft – Golf Club Building 101

Making the Cut

One of the most nerve-wracking parts of a build is cutting the shaft to length.  There’s no “Undo” button on the saw, and a mistake can be very expensive, especially with graphite shafts.  In this lesson, Nick will give you the keys to confidently making the cut.

Tools & Supplies You Need

Pipe cutter (steel shafts only)

Hack saw and vise

Tools You Want

Chop saw with cut off wheel

The Process

Step 1: Measure your shaft and mark where you want to cut.  Get the step by step directions on doing this precisely HERE.

Step 2: Use your cut saw.  A cut off wheel will work well for both steel and graphite shafts.  Let the saw get to full speed before pushing the wheel smoothly through the cut.

You’ll notice that on Nick’s saw (above), there is a jig that puts the shaft where the wheel will go all the way through.  You may need to manufacture a similar piece depending on the size your saw and cut off wheel.

Step 3: Deburr the shaft (steel only).  Using a sanding belt or sand paper, remove the rough edges around the cut.

Alternate Methods

With a steel shaft, a pipe cutter works very nicely, though it is much slower.  Clamp the cutter at your desired cut line, spin it, tighten, and repeat until the cut is made.

You can also use a hacksaw to cut shafts, but this method requires a vice.  Make sure to cut very close to the vice so that shaft doesn’t bounce around and create a poor cut.

Common Mistakes

The primary mistake that Nick noted was not lining up a cut accurately.  The age-old advice is valuable – “Measure twice, cut once.”  That can be extended to making sure that your blade is lined up perfectly over your desired cut line.  There are workarounds if you cut the shaft too much, but it’s better to do it well the first time.

Pro Tips

Leaving jagged edges on a steel shaft is a sure sign of a novice club builder.  If you don’t use a sander or sandpaper to deburr the cut edge, you’re asking to nick your hand when you smooth the grip tape.  Also, the grip will slide over a smooth edge much more easily than a jagged one.  This step takes only a few seconds, but it makes a big difference.

Watch the Video HERE

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Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

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