Honma TW757 VX Irons Review

50 Words or Less

The Honma TW757 VX irons feel sensational.  Great players look.  More forgiveness than you would expect from an iron that looks and feels like this.  Ample spin to shape shots and hold greens.

Introduction

The term “multi-material construction” calls to mind golf clubs that look like they came out of Tony Stark’s lab.  Honma doesn’t believe that needs to be the case, using advanced construction methods in an iron that is absolutely beautiful.  Is the Honma TW757 VX a beauty and a beast all in one?  I tested a set to find out.

Looks

To my eye, the address look of the Honma TW757 VX irons is perfect.  Every element hits the sweet spot – the top line, the offset, and the blade length.  There are certainly smaller irons for the butter knife crew, but these are perfect to me.

In the bag, the TW757 VX irons have a classy, traditional appearance.  There’s minimal engraving – just a Honma logo on the toe, “Forged” in the middle of the cavity, and “TW757 VX” near the bottom, all with black paint fill.  The shape of the cavity is modern without being futuristic.

One detail that the eagle-eyed will catch is that the 4-8 irons are distinct from the 9, PW, and GW.  The longer irons have a tungsten weight in the toe that’s indicated by a circle below the number on the sole.  It’s a subtle difference that many won’t even notice in the bag.

Sound & Feel

The Honma TW757 VX irons are forged from S20S carbon steel.  Combine that with the Nippon Modus shafts – one of the best feeling steel shafts, in my opinion – and you have the recipe for feel that is sensational.  To me, this is the best impact feel of any irons I’ve tested this year.  On center, it’s soft without being mushy, solid without being crisp or clicky.  What makes it interesting is that as soft as it is, impact feels very quick.  It doesn’t have that “heavy on the face” or “ball melts into the face” sensation, but it’s still immensely satisfying.

Feedback is also excellent.  Mishits are firmer than pure strikes, but they never get harsh.  Impact is quiet regardless of location, so the audio feedback is minimal.  After spending a little time with these irons, you’ll develop a keen sense of exactly where the ball met the face.

Finally, there is no noticeable change in feel between the irons with and without tungsten.  The long and mid irons are every bit as satisfying to hit as the short irons.

Performance

The purpose behind the Honma TW757 VX’s multi-material construction is to bring more forgiveness to a players iron.  With a seven gram tungsten weight in the toe of the 4-8 irons, they do just that.  While this is still unmistakably a player’s set, it’s not going to punish small misses.  Hitting the ball slightly toward the heel or toe should still result in a green in regulation.

Interestingly, despite the lofts being stronger than the TR20 V irons [review HERE], the TW757 VX irons produce plenty of spin.  In fact, they’re above average in spin, making them a great choice for those that want to shape their shots.  I also found that these irons gave me a great deal of control over trajectory.  The stronger lofts do bias them toward a lower flight, but it was easy to launch them higher when desired.

The blend of stronger launch angles with a little more spin creates distances that are in line with most players irons.  I was hitting the TW757 VX irons about the same distances as my gamers but with a little more spin.  That extra spin will be really useful in firm conditions or, again, for players that want to see the ball curve in the air.

Finally, Honma did a great job with the sole of the TW757 VX irons.  They refer to it as a “Tour-approved” sole profile.  I found that it balanced protection against digging with the ability to pinch the ball off tight lies.  Second to the impact feel, the turf interaction was my favorite thing about these clubs and another reason why I found them addictive to hit.

Conclusion

Through the first half of 2022, the Honma TW757 VX irons are at the top of my list for players irons.  They pack in more forgiveness than you can reasonably demand from an iron this compact, and the distance and spin are excellent.  Moreover, they’re incredibly fun to hit.  They have world-class feel, and they make me want to stay on the range shaping shots until the sun sets.

Visit Honma HERE

Honma TW757 VX Irons Price & Specs

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Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

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14 Comments

  1. These sound awesome, but as a low spin player I’m worried about the lower lofts. Also, I see a 2° loft gap between the pitching wedge and the gap wedge – is that right? What is the reason for that?

    • Matt Saternus

      Brian,

      I didn’t get the GW to test, so I can’t speak to that part. Regarding the spin, as I said in the review, these spin more than average in spite of the lofts.

      -Matt

    • That is super strange. Never seen anything like it in a stock set.

  2. Thanks for the review. How would you compare the size/appearance and playability to Ping’s iBlade? Haven’t come across a close comp to the iBlade to this point.

    • Matt Saternus

      Dave,

      I don’t have an iBlade in hand for side by side comparison, but my recollection is that they’re similar in size. As far as forgiveness, again, I’d say they’re pretty close.

      Best,

      Matt

  3. These do look great; like they hit that middle ground of forgiving players iron. It does seem like you would definitely need another GW with those lofts.

  4. Thanks for what turned out to be a flattering, eye opening review, Matt. Honma took a jolt when Justin Rose left them at the altar, but they’ve always had a good rep for quality. What would interest me, as a more senior player, is how the Vizard Graphite shaft performs for guys who do not “load” a shaft with as much force as you and other stronger players who prefer a steel shaft. Thanks, Steve

  5. Frederik Nørgaard

    Hey Matt, How would you compare TR20 V irons? I am currently playing a combo set of Jpx 919 tour/forged.

  6. Thanks Matt, Are these similar to the reviewed 747 V? Who sells them? I have 747v in the bag with modus 120 and can’t find a better feel or turf interaction, but toe misses go a little too short. Tried the pxg P but too much between me and the ball…

    As always, thanks! You are an invaluable resource to us all
    Bob

    • Matt Saternus

      Bob,

      Yes, they’re similar.
      Club Champion generally carries Honma. If they don’t have the new models in yet, they should soon.

      Best,

      Matt

  7. Thanks for the review. Are the numbers for the club lofts correct? I see a 4-degree change from 8 to 9 iron, then a 6-degree jump from 9-iron to PW — a crucially large interval in the range where most better golfers are debating what club to pull. And then we see only a 2-degree change from PW to GW. Why that? At 45 degrees, the GW has less loft than many high-end pitching wedges. If these are right, the lofts seem to be geared for short hitters who need all the distance they can get at the expense of carrying a lot of wedges. These clubs strike me as well-designed for the market of enthusiastic country-club players in Japan, most of whom play sparingly but enjoy using really nice, high-status clubs. The lofts, as indicated, seem out-of-sync for the U.S. market of better players. I’ll bet Honma adjusts those lofts for this market — and possibly the club lengths as well.

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