Cobra KING Utility Iron Review

50 Words or Less

The Cobra KING Utility Iron feels sensational.  Adjustability is a great feature for the low handicap player.  Good forgiveness and ball speed consistency.

Introduction

In my golfing lifetime, adjustability in drivers has gone from the hot new feature to something that’s expected in every offering.  That’s trickled down to many fairway woods and hybrids as well, but we haven’t seen much of it in irons yet.  Will Cobra’s new KING Utility Iron make adjustability the norm in utility irons?

Looks

At a glance, the Cobra KING Utility Iron looks just like the Cobra KING Forged Tec irons [review HERE].  Both irons have a very rounded toe and modest offset that’s well shaped.  The most noticeable difference is that the Utility Iron has a thicker top line.  Also, the Utility Iron appears to have a slightly shorter face.

In the bag, the KING Utility Iron would blend perfectly with the KING Forged Tec.  The only obvious difference is the badging which says “Utility” instead of “Forged Tec.”

Overall, this is a stellar looking club.  The silver and black color combination is timeless and the hollow body design makes it look like a blade in the bag.

Sound & Feel

My review of the Cobra KING Forged Tec iron notes that it might be the best feeling hollow body iron in golf.  Thus, it came as no surprise when my first swing with the Cobra KING Utility Iron had me thinking, “Is this the best feeling utility iron in golf?”

Just like the Forged Tec, the KING Utility Iron feels anything but hollow.  Solid, substantial, strong, stout.  All those things, yes.  Hollow?  Absolutely not.  I don’t know what Cobra infuses their hollow irons with, but I wish every OEM had it.

The impact sound is extremely crisp and gratifying.  There’s no doubt in your mind – or anyone else’s – when you’ve pured one, and it makes this a club you want to keep swinging.

Performance

The one feature that makes the Cobra KING Utility Iron stand out from the rest of this crowded field is its adjustability.  Each of the three models covers a range of 3 to 4 degrees of loft and offers a draw setting (more upright lie angle) in several of those lofts.

I tested the 4I which ranges from 21 degrees to 24 degrees.  When testing on a launch monitor, I saw measurable differences in launch and spin between the most extreme settings.  For me, as a low launch, low spin iron player, those differences didn’t translate to big yardage gaps, but I’m a fairly extreme case in that regard.  I think most players with the requisite speed will see a meaningful distance gap.

What stunned me, however, is how inconsistent my ball striking is with a 4I.  It’s one of those things that I know but is still jarring when you see it in black and white on the launch monitor.  Even as a slightly better than average player, I could easily negate the loft adjustment by hitting a shot thin.

The flip side of that coin is that the Cobra KING Utility Iron offers impressive forgiveness and consistency.  Even when I was hitting shots thin or off-center, the ball speed stayed in a 3-4 MPH window and the carry distance stayed in a 10 yard range.  While the adjustability may only be a major concern for the elite player, the forgiveness makes this club accessible to a wider range of golfers.

Conclusion

The Cobra KING Utility Iron impresses, just like the KING Forged Tec irons, for the way it imbues a great looking club with loads of forgiveness.  While low lofted irons still aren’t going to be an ideal choice for players without plenty of club head speed, stronger players should flock to the KING for the ability to dial in the exact loft they need.

Cobra KING Utility Iron Price & Specs

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Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

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11 Comments

  1. Joe Frigo

    got my 2 utility out yesterday and its hands down better than anything ive tried. Ive used both 790 UDi’s, Srixon u85, g410 crossover, and new level 4995

    this felt the best and gave me the ideal launch and spin. Hit one thin/low on the face and Arccos showed it only 8 yards short of my avg distance I expect with it. This will be in the bag for a long time

  2. It’s definitely a nice looking utility. I’m not sold on the adjustability as I believe you’re only changing face angle and maybe the lie angle.

  3. Will this be going in your bag now? How does it compare to the Wilson utility you tested? Thanks

    • Matt Saternus

      Blake,

      With the stock shafts, the Wilson launched higher for me. Otherwise they were very similar.
      No, the New Level is staying in the bag for now.

      -Matt

    • How does this compare with the Titleist u510 utilities? I have the 16* one iron currently in my bag and love it’s consistency and forgiveness. The rest of my bag is forged tec irons so if this is comparable then I’ll make the switch!

      • Matt Saternus

        Derrick,

        The KING Utility is a larger, more forgiving version of the Forged Tec. The U510 is a different animal entirely – bigger, faster, more forgiving, higher launching.

        -Matt

  4. Any chance you tried the one-length version of this club? That one has me VERY interested. If I could get better strike consistency with the shorter shaft I’d be all over it.

    Thanks!

    • Matt Saternus

      No, I tested the standard version. I’m skeptical about one length irons, especially in the long irons, for players with less than elite speed.

      -Matt

  5. I had the previous generation of this club and LOVED it. Stupidly sold it during a very brief window where I thought I could hit a hybrid. I saw this had released and ordered one with the Recoil 110 X. Eagerly awaiting its arrival!

  6. Jerry Pearse-Smith

    Hi Matt.
    This review was very timely for me.
    Can I just clarify whether I’ve properly understood your answer to Derrick’s question above… are you saying that the Titleist 510 is bigger, faster, more forgiving, higher launching than the Cobra Utility?
    I’ve tried the 510 and found it to be a bit challenging to hit consistently so am wondering whether the Cobra would be even more challenging?? Thanks Jerry (12 handicapper with a moderate 85mph swing speed looking for something I can hit low in windy conditions where I play)

    • Matt Saternus

      Jerry,

      Yes, you read that correctly.
      I think a major issue with these utility irons is that people perceive them as being incredibly easy to hit. They are more forgiving than most typical irons, but ultimately it’s still a fairly long shaft and a head with very little loft, and that combination is tough for most players. For the vast majority of players, I think a hybrid makes more sense than a utility iron, especially in the lower lofts (20 degrees or less).

      -Matt

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