Trion:Z Magnetic Therapy Wristbands Review

50 Words or Less

If you suffer from joint pain or muscle stiffness, the magnetic therapy offered by a Trion:Z wristband may be just the alternative you are seeking.

Introduction

The therapeutic use of magnets has been around for thousands of years.  Ancient cultures believed that physical ailments were the result of energy imbalances in a person’s body.  Magnetic rocks provided mystical powers to healers and a chance for humans to better align with nature.  Although there’s scientific understanding of magnetic forces today, their use in the medical community has believers and skeptics alike.  Trion:Z doesn’t make any bold statements of effectiveness with their polar ionic wristbands but does present a compelling case for them as alternative therapy to pain and anti-inflammatory medications.

Science

Trion:Z wristbands incorporate Colantotte magnets, which use “ANSPO” – alternating north-south polarity orientation – to increase the resultant magnetic field.  This could increase blood flow for more efficient oxygen and mineral transfer.  The Zen Loop Solo and Maxi Loop each have two 1000 Gauss magnets, while the Zen Loop Duo has double that.  For reference, a common refrigerator magnet is around 50 Gauss.  The iron core of the construction is infused with negative ions which are released “in abundant amount” – 1500 per second in the Zen Loops.  Unfortunately I couldn’t find any reference for comparison or baseline.  The general claims of users are reduced joint pain, easier daily functioning, reduced stiffness and increased mobility.

Ease Of Use & Setup

The hardest part of using a Trion:Z wristband is picking a style and color.  From there, the size guide is straightforward, but fit is a matter of personal preference.  For me, the Zen Loop Solo in small was a bit tight, where the Duo was too loose in medium.  The Maxi Loop silicone band in medium was a great fit – easy to slip on and off over my hand.  The Zen Loops open and close, so with any choice, setup is as simple as it gets.

Effectiveness

I’ve never been into holistic practices or alternative approaches to medical therapies, but I approached this assignment with an open mind.  Wearing a fashionable wristband didn’t require me to leave my comfort zone, let alone schedule a session with anyone.  Within 2 hours of slipping on the Zen Loop Solo, I had a very distinct sensation in my sinuses that I’ve previously experienced only after taking Tylenol.   I sensed an odor that I can only describe as being metallic and my sinuses cleared up.  I don’t know if it was increased circulation, reduced inflammation or a combination of both, but the results were repeatable.

I had high hopes that the Trion:Z wristbands would eliminate the clicking I get in my rebuilt knee when climbing stairs, but that didn’t end up being the case.  The clicking comes and goes whether I’m wearing a wristband or not.  But I can sure see how a placebo effect can occur, as my mind raced when the clicking diminished initially upon wearing a Trion:Z for the first time.

Conclusion

I have no doubt that the Trion:Z wristbands had some appreciable effect on my sinuses.  Beyond that I can’t report on anything noticeable.  I had my wife wear a wristband for a couple of days, and she didn’t feel or observe and effects.  Maybe we’re both already balanced and aligned, or don’t have ailments that can benefit from magnetic therapy.  I don’t doubt that “millions of people believe” in the beneficial aspects of Trion:Z or similar devices, but the scientist in me still wants more definitive studies before becoming a true believer.  In the meantime, wearing a cool wristband that might help my golf game is good enough for me.

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Matt Meeker

Matt lives in sunny Orlando with his wife who allows his golf obsession to stretch the limits of normalcy. He's also a proud coach with The First Tee of Central Florida who loves teaching kids about golf and life skills.

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4 Comments

  1. aaaaaand your hawking placebos.

  2. I mean you could at least link to some studies that support magnets might help ail muscular pain, but there aren’t any.

    • Obviously the bands and theories aren’t for everyone Conner. There are studies, but I didn’t find anything definitive or compelling enough to substantiate the products. My engineering blood runs pure for facts and figures.

      Thanks for reading,

      Matt M

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