TaylorMade SIM2 Driver Review

50 Words or Less

The TaylorMade SIM2 driver feels absolutely amazing.  Strong forgiveness.  Lower launch and spin than the other SIM2 drivers.

Introduction

Due to the lack of PGA Show and general strangeness of 2020, the new SIM2 line from TaylorMade didn’t seem to generate the hype that it normally would.  However, that hasn’t stopped this new generation of drivers from becoming fast favorites among many of the fitters that I talk to.  I was eager to get my hands on the TaylorMade SIM2 driver to see what it could do for me.

Looks

The TaylorMade SIM2 driver goes all in on carbon fiber.  The majority of the crown is black carbon fiber with just a thin band of white near the ball and a stripe of blue around the sides and rear.  On the sole, the carbon fiber provides a base for very large graphics in blue and white.

In terms of size and shape at address, the SIM2 driver looks compact with a slight pear shape that’s enhanced by the graphics.  Compared to the SIM2 Max, the SIM2 is noticeably shorter from front to back.  It’s also worth noting that the SIM2 sits perfectly square at address in the neutral setting.

Finally, a quick shout out for the stock headcover.  2021 has been a good year for stock covers, and the SIM2 is at or near the top.  I particularly like the restrained use of the blue.  It looks sharp now but won’t look dated in a year.

Sound & Feel

I LOVE the feel of the SIM2 driver.  Yes, all caps L-O-V-E.  This is, hands down, my favorite driver feel of 2021 and possibly going back a ways beyond that.  On center (and even off) it is unbelievably solid, like driving a stake with a sledge hammer.  The feel makes this driver addictive to hit.

The sound at impact is a mid-pitch “crack.”  The sound complements the feel well, but definitely takes a back seat to the way it feels.  I found that the sound doesn’t change a lot between pure and poor strikes, but there is adequate feedback through the hands.

Performance

As we’ve come to expect from TaylorMade, their new SIM2 driver comes with a dump truck full of technology buzzwords.  Several of the technologies are carried forward from previous generations: Speed Injected Twist Face, Speed Pocket, and SIM Inertia Generator.  One omission is movable weights.  This is the first time in recent memory that no driver in the TM line has adjustable weights.  There is still loft and face angle adjustability at the hosel.

The new hype is around Forged Ring Construction and Split Mass Weighting.  Forged Ring Construction refers to the aluminum piece that connects the rear weight, club face, and carbon sole.  Split Mass Weighting, as the name implies, is the idea that there are two large slugs of weight – one near the face, one at the rear.

When testing the SIM2 driver, I found that the low launch, low spin claims were certainly true.  This driver wants to produce penetrating shots with loads of potential for roll out.  For the player who prefers a lower trajectory or needs to drop some spin, the SIM2 is a great choice.

What surprised me about the SIM2 driver is the level of forgiveness.  Based on TaylorMade’s description, I expected this to be their “players only” model, but I found that it was very consistent in terms of both ball speed and direction.  Particularly in my first session, I was not swinging the SIM2 well, but I still got solid results.  On the days when I brought a better swing, the results were flat out excellent.

Conclusion

While the tinkerers may miss the adjustable weights, I think they’ll get over it when they experience the forgiveness and consistency of the TaylorMade SIM2 driver.  If you’re the kind of player who wants lower launch and spin off the tee, this needs to be near the top of your demo list for 2021.

Visit TaylorMade Golf HERE

TaylorMade SIM2 Driver Price & Specs

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Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

28 Comments

  1. Benjamin Tucker

    Matt, fantastic review! Thanks! I’ve actually been searching for Plugged In Golf’s specific review on this driver for a couple of days, so I was glad to find this. I actually just got fitted into the standard SIM 2 this past weekend. I went into the fitting mainly looking at Mizuno and Taylormade, but was expecting to go Mizuno…I play Mizuno irons, 3-wood and hybrid. But after hitting just a couple shots with the SIM 2, I was sold. I’ve never had a TM driver, so the sound and feel caught me off guard. It was amazing! I likened the sound to the sweet crack of a wooden baseball bat, as opposed to the higher-pitched ‘ping’ you get from a lot of drivers. I ended up with the standard SIM 2 at 9 degrees, with a HZRDUS Smoke 70g shaft. I can’t wait to get it in my hands. Thanks again for the review!

  2. Your description of feel immediately reminded me of the first time I hit the M5 driver outdoors on the course. The sound a feel made me want to hit it over and over again. I’ll have to give this one a swing too!

  3. Jeff Houglum

    Great review Matt! I agree, I gamed SIM last year after being a long time Titleist and Callaway driver guy. SIM gave me the best driving season I’ve had in 10 years. But it demanded a good swing as it got a little punishing when you stray from the center. SIM 2 gives me very similar numbers, but has a bit more forgiveness. Initially it appears to be a little less fade biased than SIM as well. Looking forward to this year!

  4. Thanks for another great review. I have been a big fan of your club and shaft reviews. Since you have also reviewed the TSi3, I would like to know how you would compare the two and share some general insights on why you might choose one over the other. Any differences/similarities in performance will also be helpful. Thanks and cheers!

    • Matt Saternus

      Roy,

      The TSi3 is not as forgiving as the SIM2. Beyond that, it’s up to player preference and fit.

      -Matt

  5. So the obvious question, how would you compare it to the OG Sim?

  6. Nick Richardson

    Great review as always.
    But no club data info on this review?

    • Matt Saternus

      Nick,

      Thanks for the comment. The graphic was created but didn’t display in the review for some reason. It’s updated now.

      -Matt

  7. What is the weight front heelside for? Is it to fine tune the head?

  8. Great review. I found the Sim2 to be low launch low spin with the RDX Black. I had a more low mid launch with the RDX blue and a mid launch with the Diamana TB. I also found it to be a blast to swing!!! That said, did you test it with the RDX Black??

    -Bobby

  9. Reagen Mathew

    Love the look of it! You are right, the stick headcover is 🔥!

  10. Tim Stewart

    Matt,

    Thanks for another excellent review. Did you like the driver enough to put it in your bag as your gamer or are you sticking with the Ping G425?

    • Matt Saternus

      Tim,

      I’ll be sticking with the G425 Max. As much as I love the feel of the SIM2, forgiveness is everything off the tee, for me.

      -Matt

  11. Will the Sim 2 Head take old TM Shaft adapters? (I have an M3 right now)

  12. Hey Matt,

    Based on your review I went with the G425 Max Tensei Orange 55. I am second guessing if I should have tried the Sim Max 2 or Sim 2 as do find the G425 Max not a very long hitter. I am seeing very consistent drives, but I am not a long ball hitter and some extra distance couldn’t hurt. Is the weight a factor? Any thoughts? Thanks

    • Matt Saternus

      Rick,

      Assuming the G425 was well fit, I can’t see any reason why you’d hit the SIM2 farther.

      Best,

      Matt

  13. Recently completed a fitting session and this Driver was hands down the worst performer for me. Apart from the fact it is Butt Ugly, it spun too much and was very very inconsistent.

  14. David Hurst

    Matt, you mention that technologies of past models are incorporated into the SIM2, specifically speed injection. Where are these injection points on the club face?

    • Matt Saternus

      David,

      My assumption is that TM found a way to implement that technology without the ports in the face. I haven’t taken the head apart, so I can’t say firsthand.

      -Matt

  15. Matt love the stuff as always. Due to some swing and speed changes I just upgraded my shaft from my old AD IZ 6s to a ventus black 7x (cause you wouldnt sell me yours :p) and LOVING the stability of the ventus. Im currently using the M3 440 9* head slightly turned down. My question for you is do you feel we’ve seen enough of a jump in tech (speed and forgiveness) that it warrants an upgrade from the M3 to the SIM2? In general my speeds are very similar to yours except I’m a high launch high spin guy. As always love your stuff and keep up the great reviews.

    • Matt Saternus

      Seth,

      The only changes you’re going to see are in stability/speed on mishits. The M3 was not particularly forgiving, especially at 440, so the change would be warranted if you want something more consistent.

      Best,

      Matt

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