Motocaddy CUBE Push Cart Review

50 Words or Less

The Motocaddy CUBE Push Cart combines easy folding with a very compact size.  Light weight.  Easy to steer.  Quality construction and plenty of storage.

Introduction

Motocaddy’s focus – based on the brand name – is on their motorized cart line, including the M7 Remote [review HERE].  However, the most impressive item in their catalog may be the CUBE push cart.  Why?  Because it outdoes the category’s reigning king, Clicgear, in virtually every category.

Size & Set Up

Two of the first things that I look at in a push cart are how small it is when folded and how easily it folds and unfolds.  On both counts, the Motocaddy CUBE is outstanding.  When folded, the CUBE is approximately 13″ x 16″ x 19″ which is positively tiny.  Even a small trunk will be able to hold the CUBE alongside a golf bag.

In the past, the only way to get a cart to these dimensions was through a complex folding process.  The CUBE unfolds in two steps with just one latch.  Its front wheel stays tucked away thanks to a spring, and the rest of the cart opens up with one pull.  It’s a truly brilliant design.

Your golf bag gets connected to the CUBE with two straps, as shown above.  If you have a Motocaddy golf bag, you can forego the lower strap and use the EASILOCK base instead.  EASILOCK allows the golf bag to “lock” into the cart so that it not only stays connected, it remains in the same orientation no matter how bumpy the path gets.

Storage & Accessories

The Motocaddy CUBE has a full-featured console with plenty of storage.  In the photo above, you’ll note that there’s a ball cradle and a built-in stencil for putting a line on your golf ball.  While I’m not one for lines, I think this is a very nice bonus feature.  There’s also space for six tees and a cup holder that will remain upright regardless of the handle height you choose.  Finally, there’s a clip to hold your scorecard.

When you open up the console, you’ll find two more ball cradles and space to store your valuables or on-course accessories.  The last storage area is a net under the handle (see below).  I prefer to keep my valuables in the net and my rangefinder in the console, but there’s no wrong way to use all this space.

For the mudders, Motocaddy offers an umbrella holder for $29.

On-Course Performance

Pre-round testing had already shown the Motocaddy CUBE to excel in the basics.  It’s easy to set up, and it quickly secures your golf bag.  Not having a hassle in the parking lot is a good first step to an enjoyable push cart experience.

What I didn’t fully appreciate until I got to the course is how light the CUBE is.  This push cart weighs in around fourteen pounds, roughly 33% lighter than a comparable Clicgear.  You’ll appreciate that lack of weight when you’re trying to load the CUBE into your trunk or pushing it up a hill on the back nine.  It also makes the CUBE more maneuverable when you get into tight spots.

The lack of weight doesn’t mean that the CUBE is unstable.  This cart takes a wide stance and is more than capable of dealing with uneven terrain.  The “oversize wheels” are solid rubber and maintenance free, so you can drive this cart anywhere without fear.

The final thing worth mentioning is the excellent foot brake.  It is both easy to reach and easy to engage.  Because of that, I found myself using it regularly.  If you’ve ever walked away from your cart only to have to turn and sprint downhill after it (don’t lie, we’ve all done it), you know this is an important feature.

Conclusion

The Motocaddy CUBE is one of the most impressive push carts I’ve tested recently.  It’s light, folds down to a very compact size, and sets up in two easy steps.  Pair it with a Motocaddy golf bag and you’ll have a set up that can handle any terrain with aplomb.

Visit Motocaddy HERE

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Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

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