Callaway Rogue Pro Irons Review

50 Words or Less

The Callaway Rogue Pro irons manage to blend the looks that a better player wants with the distance that every player wants.  Forgiveness surpasses expectations.  Great feel.

Introduction

If you live on golf Twitter as I do, you’ve seen a lot of industry people geeking out about the Rogue Pro irons lately.  While I don’t put a lot of stock in Twitter reactions, the consistency of these comments did pique my curiosity.  When a set came in for testing, I rushed to the range to see what the hype was about.

Looks

Callaway did an amazing job in tailoring the look of the Rogue Pro to the preference of the better player.  The top line is quite thin, and the modest offset is concealed through expert shaping.  Most noticeable is the shorter blade length – the Rogue Pro frames the ball with very little excess.

As you can see above, the difference between the Rogue Pro (left) and the standard Rogue (right) is substantial.  While they share the chrome finish, the Rogue has the size and offset to inspire confidence in the higher handicap player

Sound & Feel

There are two things that make the Rogue Pro different from the standard Rogue iron when it comes to sound and feel.  First, the Rogue Pro is slightly quieter.  Second, the Rogue Pro provides more feedback on impact location.  The sound changes more on mishits – it gets louder – and you get more feedback through your hands.

Outside of these two things, the Rogue and Rogue Pro are similar.  The sound falls between the “thud” of a forged iron and the “click” of most distance irons.  I would describe it as a firm “clap” that gives you both the satisfaction of a players club and the sense that the ball is flying off the face.

Performance

Callaway describes this iron as having the “Rogue Pro Performance Package.”  This relates mainly to the look of the club, but it also includes lofts that are one degree weaker through the set compared to the standard Rogue.  For me, this made no discernible difference: the Rogue Pro is still insanely long.  I was hitting these irons a club longer than my gamers and still getting the same trajectory and stopping power on the green.

On a similar note, the Rogue Pro has consistent distance gaps throughout the set.  I’ve noticed that some distance irons get bunched in certain parts of the set.  On the other end, the gaps between clubs are large and unwieldy.  The Rogue Pro is just the opposite.

Finally, with 360 Face Cup and Variable Face Thickness, Callaway has packed impressive forgiveness into a very attractive package.  While it’s not as stable as the larger Rogue iron, the Rogue Pro produces enough ball speed that your approach shots will clear the hazards even on mishits.

Conclusion

I don’t like to think of myself as a bandwagon jumper (who does?), but I’m absolutely joining the group that’s singing the praises of the Callaway Rogue Pro irons.  Over the last few years, we’ve seen players irons become more forgiving, but the Rogue Pro is a players iron that’s forgiving and long.

Buy Callaway Rogue Pro Irons HERE

Callaway Rogue Pro Irons Price & Specs

Matt Saternus

27 Comments

  1. Hey Matt,

    How do the Rogues and Rogue Pros compare with the previous Apex and Apex Pros? Is there a significant difference in performance?

    • Matt Saternus

      Adam,

      The Rogue Pro is similar to the Apex, the Apex Pro is slimmer and less forgiving.

      Best,

      Matt

  2. Jim Garner

    Hey Matt, I’m pretty ignorant about Twitter, who do you follow to geek out on golf?

  3. Gary Davis

    Great review Matt. I’m a Callaway fan and am playing the Callaway Apex CF-16. I bought these new when they first came out and love them. However, after almost three seasons, they are getting pretty beat up and I keep hearing Callaway can’t seem to improve on these so no new Apex’s out there yet. I play 4-5 days a week (retired) and am a 7 index. I tried the Rogue Pros at a demo day but they just didn’t have that good forged feeling compared to my Apex’s. Have you guys heard anything about new Apex’s “coming soon” or any info on that?

    • Matt Saternus

      Gary,

      I haven’t heard anything about a replacement for the Apex CF-16, but they are coming up on 2 years, so I have to think there’s a replacement in the works.

      Best,

      Matt

      • Göte Dahlback

        I tweaked the lofts on my X-Forged 18 PW-6i to the same lofts as the Rogue Pro and play the the Rogue Pro 5 and 4i. An amazing sort of combo set😊

  4. Matthew Howard

    I’m currently playing the Titleist 718 AP1’s. How would you compare these when it comes to distance?
    Thanks!

    • Matt Saternus

      Matthew,

      Some of it will come down to individual fit, but I’d expect them to be in the same ball park. If I had to pick one to be a little longer, it would be the Rogue Pro.

      Best,

      Matt

  5. P790 vs Rogue Pro. Which is longer and which is more forgiving?

    • Matt Saternus

      Joe,

      Ask 10 golfers and you’ll get 10 answers. They’re the two best in the category in my opinion. What works better will come down to fit.

      Best,

      Matt

  6. Jose Contreras

    im not a great player but love to play, I am a higher handicap than most how will these work for me. I don’t want to waste my money but I have a deal to good to pass up. I haven’t purchased a new set of clubs in over ten 10 years X18 R. Better clubs cant hurt can they

    • Matt Saternus

      Jose,

      For the high handicap player, I would probably look at the Rogue or Rogue X rather than the Rogue Pro. That said, the best advice is to get a proper fitting.

      Best,

      Matt

  7. My handicap is in the high teens and I’m working on a tight draw but my GI irons don’t seem to allow me to get a consistent repeating shot shape. I’ve been recommended the Rogue pros and I’m wondering if I will get the feel and workability. Frankly with the GI irons I don’t know where I’m hitting the clubface. Think it’s worth a shot to step up to the top of the Callaway line?

    • Matt Saternus

      James,

      I think the Rogue Pro is one of the best “transition” irons out there, along with the TaylorMade P790. It has a lot of forgiveness and distance, but also reduced offset and some feedback.

      Best,

      Matt

  8. I just got fitted by a certified club fitter at my club. We selected the Rogue Pro. They felt great.
    All the few owes say these should be for the “ better” golfer which I am not.
    He did a complete swing analysis and came up with this for me. I hit them well.
    Should I be concerned?

    • Matt Saternus

      Harry,

      There’s no reason to be concerned. If the clubs fit you, play them. You may want to go hit them one more time before you buy them, but if you hit them well, enjoy them.

      Best,

      Matt

  9. Matt, I’ve been playing the Taylormade Rocketbladz irons with regular graphite shafts for the past 4 years and decided it was time to get a little more distance. After 7 different surgeries over the past 4 years, my distance has suffered to the point of looking at new irons. I’ve since purchased the Rogue X irons and I can’t believe how much further the ball travels and forgiving too. My only problem now is that I can’t seem to get them dialed in to where I know where the ball is going to go. I’ve got the Synergy regular shafts in the Rogue X irons and they feel awesome. I’ve gained 10 to 15 yards on these new irons. I was playing to a 2 handicap just last spring, but now I’ve ballooned to a 7, mostly because when I’m 120-150 yards out, I haven’t been able to really get it dialed in like my old Rocketbladz irons. I went from a standard lie to a 2 degrees flat, which took my little draw away and now it goes straight. (most of the time), but I expect it to go where I aim… I’m strongly considering going to the Rogue Pro irons as I’m not much of an offset iron guy. I ordered the Rogue Pro iron in the gap 50 degree wedge and I can really get it dialed in when I’m 100-105 yards out. I’m thinking the other Rogue Pro irons would suit me better then the Rogue X. I might lose some distance, but I’ll take the accuracy over some minor loss in distance.
    Any suggestions or ideas?

    • Matt Saternus

      Jan,

      If the Rogue Pro gap wedge is working better then the Rogue X, it seems like it might be worth the gamble on the rest of the set. As a single digit player, the Rogue Pro should have plenty of forgiveness for you.

      Best,

      Matt

  10. Hi Matt,

    I got professionally fit for the rogues with a steel shaft and standard length, then changed my mind and went for the pros but with the same customisation. Loving the pros and hitting them well, but sometimes they feel a tad short. I notice they are a qtr inch shorter as per specs. A) why is that? B) if I got fitted as standard on the rogues should I have gone qtr inch longer on the pros?

    Thanks,

    • Matt Saternus

      William,

      The lofts are weaker in the Rogue Pros. 1/4″ of shaft length will have virtually no impact on distance.

      Best,

      Matt

  11. Thanks mate,
    Sorry just to clarify I meant short as in length. I notice that are shorter in length by a qtr inch.. why is that? And if I was fitted at standard length in the normal rogues should i go up a qtr inch in the pros that are qtr inch shorter?
    Ta,

    • Matt Saternus

      William,

      I understood the question. 1/4″ of shaft length will have a negligible effect on distance. From the Rogue Pro to the Rogue to the Rogue X, the lofts get stronger and the shafts get longer to promote distance.
      Yes, if you were fit to the standard length of the Rogue irons, you should order that length in whatever irons you buy.

      Best,

      Matt

  12. Have had the x-14s for a long time now. Looking into upgrading with something similar that would give me a little extra distance.

    Would you recommend the rogue, rogue x’s, or rogue pros as comparable clubs to the x-14s?

    Thanks in advance,
    John

    • Matt Saternus

      John,

      I always recommend getting fit before buying new clubs. That said, I think the Rogue is probably going to be closest in size to the X-14.

      -Matt

  13. Anonymous

    what handicap range would these be good for, my handicap is around 20

    • Matt Saternus

      I don’t subscribe to clubs being attached to specific handicap levels, rather we promote everyone getting fit. That said, I don’t think the Rogue Pro is out of the question for a 20 handicap.

      -Matt

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