TaylorMade M4 Driver Review

50 Words or Less

The TaylorMade M4 driver introduces the new Twist Face technology aimed at helping golfers hit the ball longer and straighter.  The M4 is the “replacement” for the previous generations’ M2 woods.

Introduction

Following a great couple of seasons with many massive wins, it was hard to imagine TaylorMade could do much more to improve their driver suite.  Never you worry, TaylorMade always has a trick up their sleeve.  That trick is Twist Face which is found in all of the new TaylorMade drivers.  I’ll discuss the Twist Face in more detail, but in short, the TaylorMade M4 driver is a bit more forgiving because of this new technology and could be quite useful to amateur golfers.

Looks

From a shape perspective, the TaylorMade M4 driver is very similar to its M2 predecessors.  The most notable changes are in the color schemes.  Yes, the 2018 woods still have the black carbon crown but gone are the neon colors and the white topline.  TaylorMade went with a red, white, and blue paint scheme and swapped out all white accenting for a new silver.  Frankly, I’m still undecided whether I like the silver or white better, but both colorways are pretty slick.

In regards to the traditional appearance questions, the M4 driver has every bit of a 460cc footprint with a medium face depth and a slight pear taper in its shape.  Given the concept of the Twist Face, it’s reasonable to think the face could look a little funky at address.  Throughout my testing, I found it very difficult to notice anything different looking down at the club behind my ball.  Overall, the M4 sets up very nicely on the tee box.

Sound & Feel

There are two factors that really impact the sound and feel of the TaylorMade M4 driver – the Hammerhead and the Geocoustic sole.  If the Geocoustic sole sounds familiar, it’s because TaylorMade has used it previously to great success.  The idea is that the sole is shaped in such a way to give an ideal sound and feel to the player.  As a result, the M4 driver feels extremely solid and powerful with a sound to match.

The Hammerhead slot is largely designed for performance benefits, but it allows TaylorMade to increase the size of the sweet spot.  The result is a powerful feel across more of the face and an explosive sound maintained away from the dead center.

Performance

Like the M2, the TaylorMade M4 driver has minimal adjustments and is fairly straightforward.  You can still make some loft and lie adjustments via the shaft adapter, but there aren’t a bunch of weights to dial in the CG of the club.  Fortunately, the M4 is a solid club and doesn’t need all of those bells and whistles.

As mentioned earlier, the Hammerhead slot is designed to increase the size of the sweet spot.

The reinforced outer portions of the slot allow for a lighter, more flexible face, while the center portion of the slot increases ball speed on low-face strikes and drops spin for more distance.

I don’t have loads of scientific data to support the Hammerhead design, but I do believe it helps.  Before even reading about the design, I was noticing shots low on the face were coming off oddly hot.  Admittedly, they were super low launching and my carry suffered a bit, but the ball maintained speed.  Normally I find that shot slowly tumbles down into ground at about 2/3 of my normal distance.  The M4 bailed me out of that low-face shot more than once and had good ball speed.

Twist Face

In order to discuss the Twist Face, it’s important to understand the design first.  TaylorMade created a face with curvature that added more loft in the high-toe and less loft in the low-heel.  What is this supposed to do?  These areas of the face are the most common misses for golfers and this design should help them by controlling the side spin that may cause you to lose control of your shot.  The graphic below helps explain how this is supposed to work.

Now we know what Twist Face is designed to do, but does it actually work?  Most golfers know that dreaded feeling from hitting off the toe or heel and the subsequent result.  For me, there was an obvious difference in those misses with Twist Face.  The Twist Face is designed to help when you miss the sweet spot with a relatively squared face.  Let’s be clear, hitting the ball in the problematic regions doesn’t magically become a good shot.  It’s important to understand that a slice or hook swing path will still slice or hook.  My experience was that the ball got in the air (and stayed in the air) more easily and my misses were smaller than normal.  For amateur golfers, the Twist Face will not be a life saver but will a great aid off the tee.

Conclusion

The biggest appeal to me in the TaylorMade M4 driver is that I do believe the Twist Face is very useful for amateurs.  If you’re dead on the screws every time, the M4 has a hot face and good feel.  For us mortals that deviate from the center and could use a little help, the Twist Face has us covered.

My biggest take away was that the M4 is very solid and has a lot of power.  My regular toe miss suffered a lot less and left me in a better positions than it normally would.  The end product of those things was me being a lot more confident on the tee.  If you’re anything like me, that’s a big gain on the golf course.

Buy the TaylorMade M4 Driver HERE

TaylorMade M4 Driver Review Price & Specs

The following two tabs change content below.

Bill Bush

Co-Founder
Bill is a true golf gear nerd by definition who loves making custom club creations in his garage with tools like sledge hammers, blow torches, and his bare hands. By day, Bill is a technology manager living in the Chicago suburbs with his wife and kids. Bill plays Scott Readman Concepts putters and accessories.

Latest posts by Bill Bush (see all)

18 Comments

  1. Jonathan Compton

    I have noticed that most reviews presume swing speeds of over 100 mph. That’s great for kids coming out of college but doesn’t do much for the rest of us who have swing speeds in the 80s and low 90s. Thus, the specs don’t help our demographic. Unless we get sucked into our egos, thinking that someday our swing speeds will miraculously increase, stats on spin, carry, etc. really don’t have much to do with us. It would be nice to get articles with data based on 80 to 90 mph swing speeds other than the XXIO brand. Signed, Imnopro

    • Jonathan,

      We’re “no pros” either, but our swing speeds and data are simply points of reference that also demonstrate consistency across our reviews, not a presumption of swing speed. Unfortunately time, access, and specs/configurations don’t always allow us to put our equipment through a whole range of swing speeds. Most of our reviews speak primarily to things unrelated to swing speed, and we make sure to point out the instances where we feel swing speed is a dependent variable.

      Frankly, even if we do ranges of comparable swing speed data for others, everyone has such unique swings that the data still wouldn’t specifically apply. The only way to know how any piece of equipment is going to perform for you is to actually hit it on a monitor yourself.

      Best,

      Bill

  2. The Twist face does work. It was first done when a Pro complained to me when I was making Wood Woods at Cobra in the 70s, he did not want to see the Heel sticking out on the bottom of the Head so I took more material off the heel and the Face looked a lot better. We started doing that on all the Drivers I made for the Pros and they all said it made the club very straight. I think that the bending down of the shaft from Centrifugal Force keeps the face straighter at impact. Now I am not a scientist but it does work, and to most good players looks better.

  3. Joe Scales

    Ok, I read the reviews of the M3 and M4 and wonder, before I go try them out, which is designed for me, a 16 handicap? Both twist face, both nearly the same length, M3 has more adjustable weights that I have not changed on my M1 since inception. Is the M4 geared to lower handicap players?

    • Neither are geared toward a specific handicap I’d say. It really comes down to which works best for you from a fitting perspective and personal preferences.

  4. Angela D Wright

    Terrible club! The design is flawed – my 14 year old daughters driver cracked on impact. I also tried it – hit a ball slightly off the toe and dented the head . 5 shots later the whole thing shattered! Ridiculous design. Not a solid club at all

    • Matt Saternus

      Angela,

      That’s pretty surprising, I haven’t heard anything else like that. Did you contact TaylorMade?

      Best,

      Matt

  5. Adam Haygood

    no she is just a hater… probably works for titleist

  6. I am looking to retire the ol’ reliable Taylormade Burner driver. I dont know of it is mental or performance but the reason it has stayed in my bag longest is because it is constantly out playing the rocketballz and Callaway drivers I try. Would you say that this is a similar “style” as the burner driver? I am far from a great golfer so u dont need any of the adjustable setups, just a 10.5 with a stiff shaft.

    • Matt Saternus

      It’s similar insofar as it’s not adjustable (outside of the hosel) and forgiving. It’s certainly worth a look.

      Best,

      Matt

  7. For me the M4 is a game changer. I play a full bag of Titleist but had struggled with my 917d2. I was getting really low launch and misses were really off line. I did a fitting where I hit the Ping, Rouge, M3 and some different configurations with the 917 and the M4 for me out performed all others by a significant margin. I was reluctant to look at TaylorMade as I am not a fan of constant releases ect. My misses whether on toe or heel are much less loss of distance and seem to fly much straighter. Again it’s not a miracle club and the occasional snap hook still rears it’s ugly head but I could not be happier with this club. As a reference my swing speed on average is about 96 to 98. I know it’s the buzz word but getting a proper fitting is so huge in getting the right driver. Cheers!

  8. Ted Falconer

    My M2 works fine. I’m kind of tired of a “new” driver every six months. Have to believe Tiger could drive with a broom handle. I think some lessons will help more then another revolutionary technology., etc.

  9. James H Morrow

    I am 73, a 3 handicaper, that just got the new TF M4 10.5′ driver with the Mitsubishi 50 gram red label regular that. Best driver I’ve ever had. Was playing an FIT Callaway 8.5′ driver with UST Recoil Regular shaft. We have the loft turned down to 9.5′. I have never been a Taylormade guy buy this driver is sensational for my needs.

  10. Tried this and 2 other drivers this year but weirdly can’t hit anything straighter or farther than my cobra f6! #secretgiveaway

  11. I am a senior average golfer. My 10 year old “off the shelf” Wilson Tour driver finally had just about had enough. I went to a local golf shop and got a fitting. The indoor simulator (my first time using one) was REALLY an eye opening experience. My swing speed with my old driver was better than I would have guessed but my overall distance was not. The pro set me up “blind test”with trying 5 (top name )drivers all with different loft and shaft flex combos. I hit each one without really trying to notice which was which. The M4 turned out to be the best for me. (The simulator didn’t lie) I have used it since on the range and twice on the course. While my new M4 didn’t turn me into Superman, I do have a noticeable difference in “feel” and a few more yards in distance. I also have added confidence in my drives.

  12. Patrick Manning

    I am 78 and not a big hitter. Been playing with Calloway drivers for years. Went on vacation to Palm Springs and rented clubs to play 2 rounds and they had latest Taylor made set with the M4 driver I was amazed st how much longer and straighter I hit. Actually the whole set played better than my Calloways

  13. Pingback: 2019 Desert Classic presented by Workday Recap - Plugged In Golf

  14. Pingback: 2019 Valspar Championship Recap - Plugged In Golf

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*