Mizuno ST-X Driver Review

50 Words or Less

The Mizuno ST-X driver has a noticeable draw bias.  Good feel on center; feedback on mishits is jarring.  Forgiveness is underwhelming.

Introduction

A few weeks back, I reviewed Mizuno’s ST-Z driver [read it HERE].  I was pleasantly surprised by the performance and very impressed with the feel.  With the bar set high, I went out to test the ST-X, the draw-biased counterpart to the ST-Z.

Looks

From Mizuno, the ST-X has a “deeper shape and slightly smaller profile” compared to the ST-Z.  To my eye, the black and carbon fiber crown is busy enough that I didn’t notice a significant difference in shape at address, though I did note the taller face.  What stood out most was that the alignment aid is shifted significantly toward the heel, and the face is very closed in the “neutral” setting.

When you turn the ST-X over, you’ll see that it’s very similar to the ST-Z but with one significant change.  Where the ST-Z has the weight aligned with the center of the face, the ST-X has the weight in the heel.  Beyond that, the sole is fairly busy with different textures, levels, and large branding.

Sound & Feel

Perhaps the greatest strength of the ST-Z driver is its feel: very solid and strong.  This is one of Mizuno’s major talking points with their new drivers, “more dense feedback.”  The same is true of the ST-X driver.  When hit on the sweet spot, it feels outstanding.  However, when you miss the sweet spot (note that I’m saying “sweet spot” not “center” because they are not the same) this driver feels very hollow.  This provides stark feedback on mishits.

The sound of impact varies almost as much as the feel.  Centered shots are quiet and medium in pitch – a fine complement to the feel.  Mishits are louder which adds to their jarring quality.

Performance

As someone who tends to miss toward the heel, draw-biased drivers have the potential to work really well for me.  The other side of that coin is that I prefer a left-to-right ball flight, especially with my driver.  All told, this means that with many draw-biased drivers I get good numbers but tend to hit the ball a bit too far left.  With the Mizuno ST-X driver, I definitely saw the left but without the excellent numbers.

When I hit the sweet spot, the ball speed from the Mizuno ST-X was as good as anything.  Unfortunately, I had a very hard time finding that sweet spot.  Feedback on impact location is not precise – in part because mishits are so jarring – so I had difficulty adjusting my swing and set up.  This did give me a good chance to observe the ST-X’s forgiveness, which I would rate as average at best.

Like the ST-Z, the launch and spin from the ST-X driver are average to slightly low.  What I found a bit troubling was how much the launch and spin jumped around when impact got low or high on the face.  Given that draw-biased drivers are generally thought of as clubs for higher handicap players, I was expecting much more robust, consistent performance.

The Mizuno ST-X driver is available in two lofts: 10.5 and 12 degrees.  Like the ST-Z, it has an adjustable hosel, and the loft can be changed up to 2.25 degrees.  As I mentioned earlier, the club face is shut in the “neutral” position, so you may want to use this adjustability to open/square the face.  Remember that opening the face decreases loft, so you may want to try the 12 degree head.  As always, fitting is the key to getting the most out of your gear.

Conclusion

While I was very impressed with the ST-Z, the Mizuno ST-X driver left me cold.  I found it difficult to dial in my contact because the feedback was imprecise, and the forgiveness was not great.  If you’re set on a Mizuno driver, there’s no reason not to try the ST-X in a fitting – your results may be completely different – but I think the ST-Z will be better for the majority of players.

Mizuno ST-X Driver Price & Specs

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Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

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7 Comments

  1. Brandon Baker

    I hit the X 12° lofted down. Didn’t do anything for me. Hit the ST-Z against the SIM2 and SIM2 Max draw and Callaway Max and Max LS. ST-Z was the longest along with the SIM2 Draw. Dispersion was tightest with the ST-Z. Tried the Cobra XD and Ping G425 max too. Nothing came close to the ST-Z. As a fader-power fader-slicer, even mishits were playable. Got me in a good launch and spin window with the stock Motore F3 shaft. Most drivers get me around 3500-4500 spin. Mishits with the ST-Z were 3000 and good strikes were mid 2000’s. Tensei Orange, Diamana D and Rogue White shafts were just way too low launch and spin. Get fit for best results.

  2. I think the ST-X would have been a better fit for Meeker, who has a slower swing speed.. I have an ST-X 10.5 and a 90mph clubbed speed– and I have hit some of my longest drives with this driver, and high toe hits have been some of my longest misses.

  3. Robert Collins

    Matt, I very much enjoy your articles. Informative, precise, to the point. My question is can you explain where the “sweet spot” is on draw biased drivers? And, is it the same for all draw drivers ? Thanks again for great reviews. Mr. C.

    • Matt Saternus

      Robert,

      Thank you!

      A driver that has a draw bias in its weighting moves the sweet spot/center of gravity toward the heel. All draw biased drivers move the weight toward the heel, but they differ in how much toward the heel and also where the CG is vertically.

      If you’d like more info on why a heel-side CG promotes a draw, I explain that here: https://pluggedingolf.com/ball-flight-laws-5-gear-effect/

      Best,

      Matt

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  5. Jason Kolton

    Just bought. Coming from PXG Gen4 0811XF. Had to adjust my tee height (lower) to find consistent sweet spot but, when i did,wow. Even my mishits where reasonably playable. Tried the comparable Ping, Cobra and Callaway. Nothing felt as good

  6. Got fitted with Mizuno STX220 10.5, tried all the usual others, but this just worked and felt so good, I’ve a slow swing speed & went with the Atmos Red 5 Reg, everything just seemed to work,
    As you say proper fitting is key as everyone is different
    Thanks for great article
    Greetings from Ireland

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