Duca del Cosma Flyer Golf Shoe Review

50 Words or Less

The Duca del Cosma Flyer is a golf shoe with a modern look and a traditional feel.  Very strong traction for a spikeless shoe.  Good waterproofing.

Introduction

Golf is rife with copycats in every facet of the industry.  Whether it’s knit shoes or a particular driver design, success is followed closely by imitation.

Duca del Cosma isn’t trying to do what anyone else is doing.  They’re bringing a unique combination of style, materials, and designs to the world of golf shoes, as they have since their inception twenty years ago.  Having seen Matt Meeker’s positive experience with Duca del Cosma [review HERE], I was eager to try a pair for myself.

Looks

With its premium nappa leather, the Flyer looks like a high end sneaker more than a golf shoe.  The blue lines take your eyes for a ride around the upper, pausing at the bold “C” on the side.  Given Duca del Cosma’s up-and-coming status, this a shoe that’s likely to get second looks as people try to figure out what you’re wearing.

To add a little more versatility to the Flyer’s look, Duca del Cosma includes two pairs of laces – one blue, one primarily black.  At the time of writing, the Flyer is available in only the Cobalt/Navy colorway shown here.

Feel

In 2020, the concept of break in time should be as outdated as a rotary phone.  The Duca del Cosma is thoroughly modern in this respect – it’s comfortable right out of the box.

What stood out most to me about the feel of the Flyer is the cushioning.  This shoe has memory foam and cork cushioning which provide a firm bed for your foot.  You’ll feel a buffer between your foot and the ground, but this isn’t the squishy, bouncy cushioning that some other makers use.

Duca del Cosma lists the Flyer as having a “Regular” fit, which is how I would characterize it, too.  No portion of the shoe is overly wide and spacious, but it’s not narrow either.  This is a middle of the road fit.

Performance

One of the things I noticed immediately when I looked at the Flyer was the uniform height of the traction nubs on the sole.  With so many manufacturers focusing on “scientifically created” tread patterns, I was interested to see how a traditional approach would fare.  I found that in everything from dry to sloppy fall conditions, the Duca del Cosma Flyer provided excellent traction.  Importantly, this sole was also wearable off the course.

Sloppy conditions allowed for testing not only the sole but also the shoe’s waterproofing.  Duca del Cosma uses both a waterproof bootie and a hydrophobic treatment on the leather to ensure that your foot stays dry.  Short of chasing your ball into a water hazard, you won’t have to worry about these shoes allowing your feet to get wet.

While the high tech waterproofing and spikeless design point to modern influences, there are some traditional elements to the Flyer.  Among those is the heel height.  This shoe features a traditional heel, meaning that it is elevated significantly above the toes.  Whether or not this is a positive thing comes down to comfort and preference.

Finally, it needs to be noted that the Flyer is a fairly heavy shoe.  In a size 13, each shoe weighs 21.3 ounces.  On the opposite end of the spectrum, the TRUE Linskwear Knit II [review HERE] weighs only 10.6.  This heavier weight is the price that you pay for leather and the thick cushioning, so it’s another question of preference and trade offs for the player.

Conclusion

At $230, the Duca del Cosma Flyer is a premium shoe that carries the price tag to match.  It’s an objectively well-made shoe with unique style and strong performance features.  If you prefer a traditional heel and don’t mind the heavier weight, it’s definitely an option worth considering.

Visit Duca Del Cosma HERE

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Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

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