Cobra RADSPEED Driver Review

50 Words or Less

The Cobra RADSPEED driver is like two drivers in one thanks to the adjustable weights.  Excellent ball speed and low spin.  Unique sound.

Introduction

Earlier this year, I tested the Cobra RADSPEED XB driver [review HERE].  For the first time in several years, I really clicked with a Cobra driver, which I attribute largely to the Radial Weighting.  When I was offered the opportunity to try the RADSPEED driver, I jumped at the chance to see how Radial Weighting worked in concert with movable weights.

Looks

Cobra has the reputation as the boldest of the major OEMs, but they balance that boldness with mass appeal in the RADSPEED driver.  The Turbo Yellow is definitely a head turner, but, at address, there’s only a hint of it at the edges of the crown.

In terms of size and shape, the RADSPEED driver hits a nice sweet spot for me.  It’s not overly stretched from front to back, but it’s not compact either.  The symmetrical shape suits my eye.  Overall, I found it to be a powerful looking club at address.

The sole of the RADSPEED driver is definitely bold, but by sticking to black, white, and one loud color, I don’t see more traditional players being put off by it.  Due to the bold Turbo Yellow graphics, the movable weights on the sole fly under the radar.  My favorite part of this driver visually is the mesmerizing Infinity Face.

The Cobra RADSPEED driver is offered in two colorways.  Shown here is the Black/Turbo Yellow version.  You can also get Peacoat (Navy)/Red.  I’m not generally a fan of colorful heads, but Cobra did a fantastic job with the “Peacoat” crown – it’s unique without being distracting.

Sound & Feel

The Cobra RADSPEED is one of the most acoustically interesting clubs I’ve hit recently.  At impact, it produces a sound that’s high pitched but not shrill.  It has a sharp, staccato character that I associate more with lower-pitched clubs.  I usually don’t find high-pitched clubs to sound strong and meaty, but somehow the RADSPEED is both.

In terms of feel, the RADSPEED driver sits somewhere between solid and explosive.  The ball feels like it’s hot off the face, but contact is more satisfying than a typical hollow slap.  There is some feedback on strike quality, but it’s surprisingly muted for a players club.

Performance

One trend I’ve noticed lately is OEMs providing more specific, accurate information to the consumer about the differences between their products.  Cobra is taking part in this with their RADSPEED drivers, and I applaud that.  Per their website, the RADSPEED is targeted at 0-15 handicaps (the RADSPEED XB is 5-15) and claims the fastest ball speed, lowest spin and launch, and most workability of the three new Cobra drivers.  These performance differences come about as a result of “forward-biased RADIAL WEIGHTING”; the RADSPEED XB has “back-biased RADIAL WEIGHTING”.

Typically when I start testing a club, one number jumps off the launch monitor.  In the case of the Cobra RADSPEED driver there were two: the ball speed and the spin rate.  I started testing with the weight forward and saw very low spin rates and high ball speeds.  The one negative of this weight forward position is that it makes the driver less forgiving.  I hit some very high peak ball speeds with the weight forward, but mishits were taxed substantially.

When I switched the weight to the back position, the numbers really moved.  Both the forgiveness and the spin jumped up noticeably.  As you can see in the chart above, my average ball speed was better with this more forgiving configuration.  Regarding spin, it’s always worth mentioning that you may see larger or smaller differences depending on your swing.

What surprised me about shifting the weights was that it didn’t change the feel as much as I expected.  I typically find that when the weight moves forward to back, one setting is good for me and one is terrible.  With the RADSPEED driver, both were very comfortable.  This may be attributable to Cobra’s Radial Weighting.

Cobra went the extra mile with the shaft options for the RADSPEED driver.  From Project X, they’re offering the HZRDUS Smoke RDX Blue [full review HERE], which is counterbalanced with a fairly stiff tip.  They also have two Fujikura Motore X options [reviews HERE].  The Motore X F3, available in regular and stiff, is a good option for the player with a moderate transition seeking a mid-launch, mid-spin shaft.  The Motore X F1, offered in stiff and X, is heavier with a stiffer shaft for higher speed, more aggressive swings.

Conclusion

Whether you’re looking for solid forgiveness or very low spin, the Cobra RADSPEED driver can deliver for you.  The movable weights had a major impact on performance for me, so make sure you get fit for the right weighting as well as the best shaft.  When tuned to your specs, the RADSPEED is an outstanding driver.

Visit Cobra Golf HERE

Cobra RADSPEED Driver Price & Specs

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Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

4 Comments

  1. Hey Matt, Another nice review. I tend to have a high driver spin rate, but just not the SS for this club I do not think … 95-98…. not to mention HC
    :( Now my question, have you noticed with this line of Cobra drivers that you had your best results when hitting a little higher on the club face? I had the F6 which which was/is a very nice club, but I did find that to be true. Later read the same from others and one other online reviewer. The golf mind is a terrible thing as I found myself thinking about it and compensating for that in my swing. Never good. Anyway, thanks for another great review. Ps- Have to love the price of the Cobra’s!!

    • Matt Saternus

      Brent,

      I can’t say that’s something I noticed. All drivers will launch higher and spin less when hit higher on the face, and that’s a good combo for most players. My concern would be giving up too much ball speed, but if the driver is forgiving enough, that might net out to be a good trade anyway. Lots of ways to get the job done.

      Best,

      Matt

  2. Hillman Dale

    Did you find this driver as long and forgiving as Ping G425 Max and Titleist TSi2? I realize a proper fitting is always in order, but was interested in your overall comparison of the 3 models.

    • Matt Saternus

      The RADSPEED is not in the same class as the G425 Max for forgiveness. I haven’t hit the TSi2, so I can’t compare that one.

      Best,

      Matt

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