Bridgestone Tour B JGR Fairway Wood Review

50 Words or Less

The Bridgestone Tour B JGR fairway wood wants to hit high draws.  Active shaft and high launching technologies in the head.

Introduction

For the recreational golfer, fairway woods can be a nightmare.  With so little loft, it’s hard to elevate the ball but very easy to slice it off the planet.

With the Tour B JGR fairway wood, Bridgestone has sought to fix those problems.  This is a club that most players will find easy to elevate and draw.

Looks

The large head of the Bridgestone Tour B JGR fairway wood should help higher handicap players to feel more confident over the ball.  Though it is large, the head has a traditional shape that gives it some appeal to better players, too.

At address, the scoring lines on the face frame the ball perfectly.  This club does tend to sit a little shut, which may help the slicers to feel more comfortable.

Sound & Feel

After I hit the JGR driver, I had high expectations for the sound of the JGR fairway wood, and it didn’t disappoint.  Impact has a mid-pitch tone with the metallic character that you’d expect from a fairway wood.  Despite being quiet, it delivers good audio feedback: misses strikes a tinny note.

The feel of the JGR fairway wood is equally good.  Pure shots feel great – hot without being hollow.  When you miss the center, you can easily feel it in your hands.

Performance

Earlier this season, I thought that I had turned a corner with fairway woods.  As the season comes to a close, that seems like an aberration rather than the new normal.  This downturn in my ability to consistently strike a 3W had me dreading my time with the JGR fairway wood, but it really gave this club a chance to shine.

The combination of the Boost Wave Crown and the active Recoil shaft make the JGR fairway wood extremely easy to elevate.  When I caught one pure, the ball flew on a beautiful, strong trajectory, and when I hit the bottom of the face, the ball still carried a reasonable distance.  Spin stayed in the mid-low range even on thin shots, and the ball speed was consistently high.

The other thing that needs to be noted about the JGR fairway wood is the draw bias.  Again, the shaft is a contributing factor, but this a club that wants to go right-to-left.  For me, that’s not the best thing, but it will be a blessing for slicers.

Conclusion

If you’re thinking about giving up on fairway woods, check out the Bridgestone Tour B JGR first.  It’s one of the easiest-to-hit fairway woods that I’ve tested this year.  Better yet, it doesn’t sacrifice high end ball speed and distance.

Bridgestone Tour B JGR Fairway Wood Price & Specs

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Matt Saternus

Co-Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is a golf instructor, club fitter, and writer living in the northwest suburbs of Chicago. Matt's work has been published in Mulligan Magazine, Chicagoland Golf, South Florida Golf, and other golf media outlets. He's also been a featured speaker in the Online Golf Summit and is a member of Ultimate Golf Advantage's Faculty of Experts.

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2 Comments

  1. So as a golf professional, what do you do in the offseason if you live in a place that has seasons that aren’t conducive to year round golf? Living in California I sometimes forget that for a lot of the country golf is a seasonal game.

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