Fujikura Speeder Evolution IV Shaft Review

50 Words or Less

The Fujikura Speeder Evolution IV is the latest in the company’s premium shaft family.  Based on the low launch, low spin Evo II but with softer mid section and new high strength materials.

Introduction

Fujikura’s Speeder Evolution series has been one of my favorites since it was launched.  Despite having different performance characteristics, all the shafts in the family share a unique feel that I love.  After learning that the new Evolution IV blends the properties of the Evo II and Evo III, I couldn’t wait to get my hands on one for testing.

Looks

The Speeder Evolution IV is a major break from the past in terms of looks.  The original Evo was bright blue, and the II and III went with a fiery red and orange combo.

For the Evo IV, Fujikura went with a classy black and gold color scheme.  The graphics remain the same: long, white Speeder branding on one side with colored branding and specs opposite.

While I enjoyed the flashy looks of the past Evo shafts, this is a nice change of pace.  The gold accents and bold graphics help it stand out in an ocean of black shafts.

Feel

The Speeder Evolution IV is the most stout-feeling shaft in the family.  That signature whip-crack energy transfer is still there, but it’s dialed down significantly from past versions.

Players who tend to hook the ball will love the feel of the tip section.  It’s absolutely rock solid.

If you found previous Speeder Evolution shafts too lively, this may be the one for you.

Performance

There’s a lot of tech talk in the description of the Speeder Evolution IV, and, to be honest, it’s over my head.  Here’s the part that I understand: the profile is based on the low launch/low spin Evo II but with a softer middle for higher launch.  For me, that translates to perfection.  A shaft with a stiff tip gives me the confidence to swing aggressively, but I still want to feel like the shaft is working for me.

When I got the Evo IV to the range, the results were exactly what I was hoping for: high, straight bombs.  The stability of the tip made it very hard for me to lose the ball left, but the softer mid-section kept the ball launching on an ideal trajectory.

The Fujikura Speeder Evolution IV is available in three models: the 569, 661, and 757.  Weights range from 56 grams all the way up to 78.5, and flexes run from regular through X.

Conclusion

The Fujikura Speeder Evolution IV shaft gave me the exact feeling I want: that of being totally responsible for the results.  This shaft stayed up with my strongest swings and produced some action on my 70% swings, too.  Combining that great feel with near-perfect numbers on the launch monitor can only mean one thing: it’s in the bag.

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Matt Saternus

Co-Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is a golf instructor, club fitter, and writer living in the northwest suburbs of Chicago. Matt's work has been published in Mulligan Magazine, Chicagoland Golf, South Florida Golf, and other golf media outlets. He's also been a featured speaker in the Online Golf Summit and is a member of Ultimate Golf Advantage's Faculty of Experts.

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8 Comments

  1. Thanks for your review..clear like always
    Compare to the EVO III 661 or 569 which do you prefer finally?
    Figures were better with EVO III if remember…
    Philip

  2. Golf is such an odd thing… when I got fit I hit all 3 of the Fuji shafts and felt the IV was actually the softest of them all. I got the highest peak ball speed and swing speed with it but it was the least consistent. Ended up getting fit into the II which to me felt more stable. Now 4 months later the only thing I don’t like with the II is that every swing requires 100% speed. Doesn’t load as well if you take a little off…I feel like the III and even the IV would perform better for those kinds of swings. Just goes to show you how important getting fit is! Good review as always.

  3. What is the difference when compare to Tensei Orange Pro?

    • Matt Saternus

      Ryan,

      The Tensei Orange is counter balanced with a different feel, but both have very stable tips.

      Best,

      Matt

  4. Tom Cafferty

    Hard to imagine an upgrade on the Evo III. Having a full bag fitting in September so will be keen to try the IV.

    I fitted the III after your review on it so am expecting the IV to work wonders.

    Keep up the honest reviews 👍

  5. John Willz

    I know you mention the VI has a solid tip section. How would you say it compares to Tensei Orange Pro’s “extreme” tipping?
    Given the overall softer mid on the VI, I would expect the VI to have a bit more action down at the tip. Thanks

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