Podcast Episode 100 – The Great Distance Debate

Does the golf ball go too far?  Do Tour pros need to be reined in?  Should everyone have their distance rolled back?  The Plugged In Golf Staff discuss these questions and many more in our special 100th episode.

Listen to the Plugged In Golf Podcast on iTunes HERE

Download this episode HERE

The PluggedInGolf Podcast is sponsored by One Farm by WAAYB.

The following two tabs change content below.

Matt Saternus

Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is the Founder and Editor in Chief of Plugged In Golf. He's worked in nearly every job in the golf industry from club fitting to instruction to writing and speaking. Matt lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago with his wife and two daughters.

Latest posts by Matt Saternus (see all)

2 Comments

  1. Justin Thomas points out that, of the multiple tournament winners on the PGA Tour this year, 2020, only one (him) is in the top 10 in driving distance. One of the multiple winners is one of the shortest drivers on Tour, Brendon Todd. He averages 281 yards of driving distance. That means half of his drives are shorter than that. There is no need to limit golf ball length. A good course set up will sort out the best players of the week regardless of driver length. Morikawa is not one of the longest drivers on Tour and he won the PGA tournament.

  2. We do get hung up on driving distance without due consideration given to every other club. Was the fact Sergio hit an 8 iron into a par 5 due to driver technology iron technology, ball technology or weight lifting? Course set up can be one tool except for Augusta as every course can grow the rough where they think best but it might be too artificial to pinch fairways at a specific length however golden age courses like Augusta cannot without losing their identity so ball limitation may be the only way for them. As a rock climber i am used to the idea that the harder the climb the fewer holds there are and the fewer ways of using the holds there are so perhaps a sliding scale of handicap or COR can be used and the lower the handicap the fewer choices of ball you get so by the time you get on tour you are limited to just one ‘tour’ ball whoever it is made by. If using COR then moving away from the limit gives you more ball options than being at the limit and allows ball and club technology to move in different directions.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*