Titleist C16 Irons Review

50 Words or Less

The Titleist C16 irons are good irons but they don’t merit the giant price tag.

Introduction

For better or worse, PXG dramatically changed the way golf clubs are priced.  By finding success with clubs that cost double what other OEMs charge, they showed the rest of the industry that there’s a market for sticks with massive price tags.  Thus was born the Titleist C16 iron – a Titleist iron with a PXG price tag.

Looks

In terms of size, the Titleist C16 irons fall between the AP1 and AP2.  Titleist, of course, focuses on the comparison with the AP1 so that they can emphasize the “slightly narrower sole, thinner topline, and shorter blade length.”  None of those statements are inaccurate, but they shouldn’t be taken to mean that the C16 is a tiny iron – it’s firmly in the middle of the pack.

One clever visual element of the C16 is that the top line is partially matte (like the face) and partially chrome (like the back).  This has the effect of making the top line look much thinner than it is.

Sound & Feel

After hitting the Titleist C16 for a while, my conclusion was that every shot felt ok.  Hitting it really flush isn’t that rewarding, but misses are barely punished.  Mishits still feel soft, not stinging.  You’re not going to confuse a toe shot with a centered one, but the feedback is far from precise.

Performance

If you read Titleist’s description of the C16 irons, you’d think that they had reinvented the wheel.  It’s buzzword bingo: “multi-material hollow construction,” “maximum carry distance,” “increased ball speed,” “greater consistency,” and I’ve barely scratched the surface.

I’m going to skip the technical bits and marketing jargon to give it to you plainly: this is a fine iron, but it’s not special.  Is it forgiving?  Sure, but no more so than a half dozen other irons that look just as good.  Is it long?  Absolutely, but no longer than other irons with similar specs.  This is not a top secret, USGA-defying prototype, it’s a solid iron with a new marketing pitch.

Conclusion

The Titleist C16 irons are a fine set of clubs, but there’s nothing here that merits the $3000 price tag.  What’s being sold here is exclusivity, or at least the appearance thereof.  If you want to pay for performance, you’re much better off getting a proper club fitting for the shaft and head that are best for you.

Titleist C16 Irons Price & Specs

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Matt Saternus

Co-Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is a golf instructor, club fitter, and writer living in the northwest suburbs of Chicago. Matt's work has been published in Mulligan Magazine, Chicagoland Golf, South Florida Golf, and other golf media outlets. He's also been a featured speaker in the Online Golf Summit and is a member of Ultimate Golf Advantage's Faculty of Experts.

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10 Comments

  1. Not sure whether you hate PXG or just expensive golf clubs. A review should be about what’s good and what’s bad about the clubs, not about the worth or value of the clubs. Everyones’ price point is different so why make it sound so negative?

    Just a thought.

    • Matt Saternus

      Erik,

      I don’t hate anything – it’s just golf. What I dislike are products that deliver poor value: huge prices without matching performance benefits.

      -Matt

  2. Matt, couldn’t agree more with your take on this issue! At least PXG put a lot of their own R&D and innovation into their clubs! Looks like Titlest just decided to do a modified knockoff! Hope this isn’t the future of golf products!!!

  3. As always PIG call it how they see it rather than the “oohs and aaahs” of many other reviewers who often regurgitate the marketing information. Without a doubt the reviewers I trust the most! Cheers Lads! I continue to look forward to your reviews.

  4. Already a bunch of C16 stuff on eBay…when’s the last time Titleist has put out something with something new universal buzz/approval besides Vokey? AP1/2 I suppose?

    • Matt Saternus

      Mitch,

      Interesting question. Titleist has some of the most loyal fans, so all their releases generate buzz among that group. Outside of their base? Original AP1/AP2 and/or 910 metalwoods sounds about right.

      Best,

      Matt

  5. buckeyewally

    Great review Matt. Sometimes it hurts, but sometimes it’s refreshing to see a review that tells it like it is. No fluff just the facts!

  6. Harry McKeon

    Hello

    I have played titleist AP2 (both 714& currently 716 model) and last week tested AP2 with a different shaft option against c16. I am age 52 for reference and play off a handicap of 3. I improved my stats with the new shaft on the AP2 but I got 10% improvement with the C16 which I think is significant. I loved the looks of the c16 and to me the feel was good.

    What other irons would give me the same length, foregiveness and looks as the C16. Seriously considering them, just need to cancel the family holiday to cover the cost!!!

    • Matt Saternus

      Harry,

      If distance is at a premium, I would consider the Callaway Apex irons, the Srixon Z 765, and the PING i200 w/Power Specs.

      Best,

      Matt

  7. Jason Grondin

    Just had a club fitting at the Titleist facility at Manchester lane June 27th. Tried all the clubs, irons/shaft combos as well as my current gamers and the best fit for me were the c16’s over the TMB’s and Ap2’s. I was surprised but the proof was in the numbers and I loved the look and feel of the c16’s. Moving out of TM RSI2’s, 36 yr old male, 4.5 handicap. Keeping my current driver and wedges, new irons, woods and hybrid. Money well spent in my mind.

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