Odyssey O-Works V-Line Fang CH Putter Review

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The Odyssey O-Works V-Line Fang CH putter has a plumber’s neck on a fang-shaped head to make for a unique putting experience along with the new Microhinge insert.

Introduction

Odyssey has been the insert putter expert for years and has seen a great deal of success around the world.  Rather than sit back and ride the acclaimed White Hot insert, Odyssey has created different types of inserts to accommodate a range of preferences.  I believe Odyssey has produced their best insert yet in the Microhinge face found in the O-Works putters.  Looking to expand their options, Odyssey dropped a plumbers neck on the V-Line Fang head.

Looks

Odyssey‘s V-Line Fang headshape is fairly new to their putter arsenal.  Like the rest of the O-Works lineup, Odyssey tossed a black/white/black Versa scheme on it.  Unlike the blade options, the V-Line Fang CH has the Versa 90 pattern.  This pattern is perpendicular to the face as opposed to parallel.  The V-Line Fang CH shape is very similar to the #7 shape, but has rounder fangs and smoother lines.  Flip the putter over and you’ll find red weights and cool laser-etched graphics.

Sound & Feel

I mentioned in the review for the O-Works #1 that the Microhinge insert has a nice middle ground feel to it.  Though the Odyssey O-Works V-Line Fang CH has the same insert, it has a much different feel.  While far from mushy, the V-Line Fang CH has a more muted, softer feel than the O-Works blades.  I would assume that this is caused by the larger, perimeter-weighted head absorbing the impact of the ball differently.

The sound has less resonance than the #1, what I hear as a flatter “tap”. Simply put, the sound and feel in the V-Line Fang CH have more typical insert putter characteristics than the #1.

Performance

Before diving into Odyssey‘s Microhinge insert and its performance, I think it’s important to cover how this type of mallet is impacted by a plumber’s neck.  Typically mallets like this are built to be face balanced for very minimal arc in the putting stroke.  By adding the plumber’s neck with a full shaft offset, the putter now has toe hang and a natural arc during the stroke.  The point to keep in mind is that if you’re a historical #7 or V-Line Fang fan, this putter is not necessarily going to play the same for you.  It becomes a very different animal once that different neck is added.

There are different theories about how a ball is supposed to come off the putter face.  Most companies are striving to get the ball rolling end-over-end as fast as possible.  Odyssey‘s Microhinge face has little hinges on it that help the ball roll with immediate topspin.  My experience was that the ball started its roll almost immediately with the O-Works.  I paid close attention looking for any noticeable skid, but this was difficult.

Once I adjusted to the different balance from the “Crank Hosel,” the V-Line Fang was easy to make a good stroke with and felt very balanced.  The controlled arc and Microhinge made for very nice ball roll.

Odyssey-V-Line-Fang-CH-12

Conclusion

Whether you’re looking for more feel in your insert or are just due for a refresh, the Odyssey O-Works range is worth a look.  Soft feel with precise response and a pure roll should please any golfer out there.  With all the classic Odyssey headshapes in the lineup, Odyssey also has options like the V-Line Fang CH for players looking for something a little non-traditional.

Buy Odyssey O-Works putters HERE

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Bill Bush

Co-Founder, Director of Technology at PluggedInGolf.com
Bill is a true golf gear nerd by definition who loves making custom club creations in his garage with tools like sledge hammers, blow torches, and his bare hands. When Bill isn't working on PluggedInGolf.com, or in the garage, he is a technology manager living in the Chicago suburbs with his wife and kids. Bill plays Scott Readman Concepts putters and accessories.

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2 Comments

  1. Bruce Laycraft

    It is not possible to impart overspin while putting a golf ball with a level stroke and hitting it in the centre! To get overspin, you would have to hit the golf ball above its equator/centre with an upward swing (to negate the downward vertical force vector that would be created by hitting the ball above the equator with a level swing). Hitting any ball above the equator with a level stroke means you would be contacting the ball with the bottom edge of the putter. Yes you would get overspin this way but you would also bounce the ball.

    • Bruce, what you wrote makes sense. So, I’d like to know what putter you use and/or recommend :)

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