Cleveland CBX Wedge Review

50 Words or Less

The Cleveland CBX wedges are designed to bring forgiveness to the short game and better match golfers’ cavity back irons.

Introduction

In my recent Q&A with Cleveland Golf’s John Rae, he said something that was forehead-slappingly obvious: the vast majority of golfers player cavity back irons, and their wedges should match.  If we all acknowledge that we need a little forgiveness in our iron play, why wouldn’t we want that in our wedges where precision is at an even greater premium?  That was the question that drove the creation of the new Cleveland CBX wedges.

Looks

The Cleveland CBX wedge is slightly larger than average, an appearance that’s enhanced by the round shape.  As you can see above, the leading edge is rounded, though not extreme.  Similarly, the toe is rounded but still playable even for those that prefer something more square.

One very clever visual touch has been employed along the top line.  The back half is mirrored in contrast to the front half’s matte finish to make the top line appear smaller.

Where the CBX is unique is on the back.  There’s a noticeable cavity along the upper section and much of the sole area is hollowed out as well.

Sound & Feel

The Cleveland CBX wedge is noticeably firmer than the RTX-3Impact feels very solid, but the feedback is slightly muted as you would expect when comparing a cavity back to a blade.

Performance

The big question is, does a cavity back really help in a wedge?  I’m going to leave the deep data dive for a future Golf Myths Unplugged, but my personal testing shows that it absolutely does.

In comparing the Cleveland CBX wedge to a Cleveland RTX-3, I was focused on three things: ball speed, launch angle, and spin.  I was surprised to see that the difference between the RTX-3 and CBX was not huge when it came to ball speed.  The CBX was better at retaining ball speed on mishits, but the difference wasn’t huge.

The difference was larger when it came to launch angle and spin.  With the RTX-3, it was easy to drop 7-8 degrees of launch angle or a couple thousand RPMs of spin with a mishit.  I had to work hard to see similar losses with the CBX.  What that means on the course is that your short game shots will be more predictable.  Even if you catch a pitch a little thin, it will still launch reasonably high.  Miss the center of the face a bit and you can still get green-grabbing spin.

On that note, the CBX is be one of the highest spinning wedges I’ve tested in a long time.  I was routinely into 10,000 RPM plus territory with the CBX, often crossing into 11,000 RPM.  For someone who doesn’t have pro club speed (or short game skill), that’s a lot of zip.

Conclusion

I’ve run the full gamut of expectations with the Cleveland CBX wedge.  When I first saw the press release, I was skeptical.  After talking to John Rae, my expectations were very high.  Now having played it, I think that cavity back wedges make all the sense in the world for the vast majority of golfers.

Cleveland has staked their claim to this new segment of the market, and if their first effort is any indication, the other OEMs will have to work really hard to catch up.

Buy Cleveland CBX Wedges HERE

Cleveland CBX Wedge Price & Specs

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Matt Saternus

Co-Founder, Editor In Chief at PluggedInGolf.com
Matt is a golf instructor, club fitter, and writer living in the northwest suburbs of Chicago. Matt's work has been published in Mulligan Magazine, Chicagoland Golf, South Florida Golf, and other golf media outlets. He's also been a featured speaker in the Online Golf Summit and is a member of Ultimate Golf Advantage's Faculty of Experts.

Latest posts by Matt Saternus (see all)

19 Comments

  1. I want to try a 50 Deg Cleveland CBX wedge

    I use Cleveland RTX cavity backs
    Handycap 26

  2. I currently use Cleveland RTX 58degree with 6 degree of bounce, would like to try the same in the CBX.

  3. I’m currently using mizuno jpx900 hot metal wedges especially the 50 degree in left hand golfer would love to see the forgiveness and performance to get me to switch all my wedges to the Cleveland CBX I’m currently a 18 handicap left hand golfer

  4. Daniel Snarski

    Dan S
    13 hdcp
    I’m 72
    St Pete Fl
    56*
    I’ve played the Cleveland CBX wedge for the last 4 years and love it. At my age my short game is my main weapon and Cleveland does it!

  5. Dave S.
    16 handicap
    I’m 47.
    I have Cleveland RTX 2.0 54 & 60
    I have high bounce on the 54 and low bounce on the 60. The distance gap is big on full shots.
    I’d like to test CBX 54 or 58 degree!

  6. I moved to a set sand wedge for the C200’s (which was like finding a unicorn in the wild), so I could get the cavity back forgiveness over my 52* PMP wedge. Since my GW goes ~100 yards, anything inside that meant I had to full swing a wedge, or partial swing a longer club. Neither provided me with a good option. The Cleveland CBX may do the trick though.

  7. Matt, having tested both the Ping Glide 2.0 and now the Cleveland CBX, which wedge did you prefer? I just bought the Ping g400 irons (whoa, are they sweet) and wonder if the Glide 2.0 might be a better wedge for me, since I’ll be playing the AWT shafts in the G400 irons. Any input appreciated. Thanks!

    • Rick,

      I haven’t compared the two head to head, but my gut reaction is that the CBX wins on forgiveness, the Glide 2.0 gives you more sole options. It’s a question of what you value.
      I think there is something to be said for consistency in the shafts. How much that’s worth, I don’t know.

      Best,

      Matt

  8. Pingback: Cleveland Launcher CBX Irons Review - Plugged In Golf

  9. I have the ping gmax the ping sw I should replace it with the 56 cbx I have to use the 60 cbx thanks

  10. Andrew @ The Best Sand Wedge

    Great review and these sound great although I wish they would have more of a traditional chrome finish. I think you can bet your bottom dollar that the other major OEM’s are going to follow suit and offer something like this soon.

  11. Matt,
    I am a 1.8 HDCP and have the RTX-3 Wedges from last year in 50,54,58. I have a steep angle of attack and always carry wedges with high bounce. I buy wedges every year and am considering putting a 50* CBX in my bag as i swing Callaway Apex Pro irons. In swinging this club, do you see any negatives for me as i never use my 50* around the greens, it is an approach wedge from 135 always for me??
    Thank you

    • Matt Saternus

      Matthew,

      No, I don’t. I play a PING Glide 2.0 as my 50* wedge for the same reason – the extra forgiveness on fuller swings. Kudos to you for taking the smart route instead of letting your ego drive the bus.

      Best,

      Matt

  12. Thank you Matt! Appreciate the quick reply.

  13. Is there a difference in the CBX wedges and the Launcher CBX wedges?

    • Matt Saternus

      David,

      Are you referring to the wedges that come with the Launcher CBX iron set? If so, there is an aesthetic difference, but I’m not sure how much of a performance difference there would be. My expectation is that they’re fairly similar.

      Best,

      Matt

  14. Matt, another great review. I am relative new to the game (currently sporting a 15 index) and play 4-5 times a month. I have been using the Titleist 716 AP1 irons (5 to W47 in True Temper XP90 in R300 regular flex) and Vokey SM 6 wedges in 52, 56 and sometimes 60 (in wedge flex, which fits me well).

    I am very tempted to add the CBX wedges in 52 and 56. My only concern is whether the Cleveland stock shaft for the CBX wedges (True Temper Dynamic Gold 115) will feel dramatically different than the AP1 stock shaft (True Temper XP90 – R300) or Vokey wedge shaft flex ( True Temper Dynamic Gold, S200).

    My guess is that the CBX stock shaft is closer to the AP1 stock shaft in feel than the Vokey stock shaft.

    Thanks!

    • Matt Saternus

      Chris,

      The DG 115 is very similar to your Vokey shafts, just a touch lighter. If you’re uncomfortable with the shafts, you can always swap them out.

      Best,

      Matt

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